What is turn up?

  • (verb): Bend or lay so that one part covers the other.
    Example: "Turn up your collar"
    Synonyms: fold, fold up
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on turn:

Slang (album) - Personnel - Additional Musicians
... Spanish voice on "Slang" Ram Naravan – intro sarangi sample on "Turn to Dust" Craig Pruess – string and percussion arranging and conducting on "Turn to Dust" Av Singh – dohl on "Turn to Dust ...
Turn - Place Name
... England Turn Village, in Lancashire, England Czech Republic German name of Trnovany. ...
Michigan Left
... left is an at-grade intersection design which replaces each left turn with a permutation of a U-turn and a right turn ... contexts, the intersection is called a median U-turn crossover or median U-turn ... The design is also sometimes referred to as a boulevard turnaround or a thru turn intersection ...
Frontside - Snowboarding
... When turning, backside is analogous to a toeside turn, and frontside is analogous to a heelside turn ... In the air, backside means that you turn the front of your body into the rotation first and frontside means you turn your back into the rotation first ...
The Clapper - In Popular Culture
... In the 1989 film Uncle Buck, the title character uses The Clapper to turn on the lights in his apartment In the pilot episode of Tyler Perry's Meet The ... Connelly's TV so that he can turn it off from his apartment below by clapping ... a clapper" the gag ends with the lamp flying out the window to turn it off ...

More definitions of "turn up":

  • (verb): Discover the location of; determine the place of; find by searching or examining.
    Synonyms: locate

Famous quotes containing the word turn:

    If we focus exclusively on teaching our children to read, write, spell, and count in their first years of life, we turn our homes into extensions of school and turn bringing up a child into an exercise in curriculum development. We should be parents first and teachers of academic skills second.
    Neil Kurshan (20th century)

    As the end of the century approaches, all our culture is like the culture of flies at the beginning of winter. Having lost their agility, dreamy and demented, they turn slowly about the window in the first icy mists of morning. They give themselves a last wash and brush-up, their ocellated eyes roll, and they fall down the curtains.
    Jean Baudrillard (b. 1929)