What is turn?

  • (verb): Cause to move along an axis or into a new direction.
    Example: "Turn your face to the wall"; "turn the car around"; "turn your dance partner around"
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on turn:

Frontside - Snowboarding
... When turning, backside is analogous to a toeside turn, and frontside is analogous to a heelside turn ... In the air, backside means that you turn the front of your body into the rotation first and frontside means you turn your back into the rotation first ...
Turn - Place Name
... England Turn Village, in Lancashire, England Czech Republic German name of Trnovany. ...
Slang (album) - Personnel - Additional Musicians
... Ram Naravan – intro sarangi sample on "Turn to Dust" Craig Pruess – string and percussion arranging and conducting on "Turn to Dust" Av Singh – dohl on "Turn to Dust" Shyam Vatish – outro sarangi sample ...
Michigan Left
... design which replaces each left turn with a permutation of a U-turn and a right turn ... In other contexts, the intersection is called a median U-turn crossover or median U-turn ... The design is also sometimes referred to as a boulevard turnaround or a thru turn intersection ...
The Clapper - In Popular Culture
... Buck, the title character uses The Clapper to turn on the lights in his apartment In the pilot episode of Tyler Perry's Meet The Browns, Leroy Brown talked about how he went to a store and ... Connelly's TV so that he can turn it off from his apartment below by clapping ... have a clapper" the gag ends with the lamp flying out the window to turn it off ...

More definitions of "turn":

  • (verb): Pass into a condition gradually, take on a specific property or attribute; become.
    Synonyms: grow
  • (verb): Undergo a transformation or a change of position or action.
    Synonyms: change state
  • (noun): A movement in a new direction.
    Synonyms: turning
  • (verb): To send or let go.
    Example: "They turned away the crowd at the gate of the governor's mansion"
  • (noun): An unforeseen development.
    Example: "Events suddenly took an awkward turn"
    Synonyms: turn of events, twist
  • (noun): Taking a short walk out and back.
    Example: "We took a turn in the park"
  • (noun): Turning away or in the opposite direction.
    Example: "He made an abrupt turn away from her"
  • (noun): A circular segment of a curve.
    Synonyms: bend, crook
  • (noun): A time for working (after which you will be relieved by someone else).
    Synonyms: go, spell, tour
  • (verb): Direct at someone.
    Example: "She turned a smile on me"; "They turned their flashlights on the car"
  • (verb): Let (something) fall or spill a container.
    Example: "Turn the flour onto a plate"
    Synonyms: release
  • (noun): Turning or twisting around (in place).
    Synonyms: twist
  • (verb): Get by buying and selling.
    Example: "The company turned a good profit after a year"
  • (verb): To break and turn over earth especially with a plow.
    Example: "Turn the earth in the Spring"
    Synonyms: plow, plough
  • (verb): Shape by rotating on a lathe or cutting device or a wheel.
    Example: "Turn the legs of the table"; "turn the clay on the wheel"
  • (noun): The act of changing or reversing the direction of the course.
    Example: "He took a turn to the right"
    Synonyms: turning
  • (noun): (sports) a period of play during which one team is on the offensive.
    Synonyms: bout, round
  • (verb): Become officially one year older.
    Example: "She is turning 50 this year"
  • (noun): The activity of doing something in an agreed succession.
    Example: "It is my turn"
    Synonyms: play
  • (verb): Change orientation or direction, also in the abstract sense.
    Example: "Turn towards me"; "The mugger turned and fled before I could see his face"; "She turned from herself and learned to listen to others' needs"
  • (verb): Cause to change or turn into something different; assume new characteristics.
    Example: "The princess turned the frog into a prince by kissing him"; "The alchemists tried to turn lead into gold"
  • (verb): Undergo a change or development.
    Synonyms: become
  • (verb): Move around an axis or a center.
    Example: "The wheels are turning"
  • (verb): Cause to move around or rotate.
    Example: "Turn a key"; "turn your palm this way"
  • (noun): A short theatrical performance that is part of a longer program.
    Synonyms: act, routine, number, bit
  • (verb): Cause (a plastic object) to assume a crooked or angular form.
    Example: "The strong man could turn an iron bar"
    Synonyms: flex, bend, deform, twist
  • (verb): Channel one's attention, interest, thought, or attention toward or away from something.
    Example: "The pedophile turned to boys for satisfaction"; "people turn to mysticism at the turn of a millenium"
  • (verb): Pass to the other side of.
    Example: "Turn the corner"
    Synonyms: move around
  • (verb): Cause to move around a center so as to show another side of.
    Example: "Turn a page of a book"
    Synonyms: turn over
  • (verb): Change color.
    Example: "In Vermont, the leaves turn early"
  • (verb): Have recourse to or make an appeal or request for help or information to.
    Synonyms: call on
  • (verb): Alter the functioning or setting of.
    Example: "Turn the dial to 10"; "turn the heat down"
  • (noun): A favor for someone.
    Example: "He did me a good turn"
    Synonyms: good turn
  • (verb): Accomplish by rotating.
    Example: "Turn a somersault"; "turn cartwheels"

Famous quotes containing the word turn:

    Bright yellow, red, and orange,
    The leaves come down in hosts;
    The trees are Indian princes,
    But soon they’ll turn to ghosts;
    William Allingham (1824–1889)

    Rejoice, and men will seek you;
    Grieve, and they turn and go.
    They want full measure of all your pleasure,
    But they do not need your woe
    Ella Wheeler Wilcox (1850–1919)

    An actor rides in a bus or railroad train; he sees a movement and applies it to a new role. A woman in agony of spirit might turn her head just so; a man in deep humiliation probably would wring his hands in such a way. From straws like these, drawn from completely different sources, the fabric of a character may be built. The whole garment in which the actor hides himself is made of small externals of observation fitted to his conception of a role.
    Eleanor Robson Belmont (1878–1979)