What is title?

  • (noun): A legal document signed and sealed and delivered to effect a transfer of property and to show the legal right to possess it.
    Example: "He kept the title to his car in the glove compartment"
    Synonyms: deed, deed of conveyance
    See also — Additional definitions below

Title

A title is a prefix or suffix added to someone's name in certain contexts. They may signify either veneration, an official position or a professional or academic qualification. In some languages, titles may be inserted before a last name (for example, Graf in German, Cardinal in Catholic usage or clerical titles such as Archbishop). Some titles are hereditary.

Read more about Title.

Some articles on title:

2005 US Open (tennis) - Seniors - Men's Singles
2–6, 7–6(1), 6–1 It was Federer's 10th title of the year, and his 32nd overall ... It was his 6th career Grand Slam title, and his 2nd (consecutive) US Open title ...
Quiet Title
... An action to quiet title is a lawsuit brought in a court having jurisdiction over land disputes, in order to establish a party's title to real property against anyone and ... This legal action is "brought to remove a cloud on the title" so that plaintiff and those in privity with him may forever be free of claims against the property ... The action to quiet title resembles other forms of "preventive adjudication," such as the declaratory judgment ...
Forensic Pathology - Investigation of Death - Terminology Is Not Consistent Across Jurisdictions
... In some jurisdictions, the title of "Medical Examiner" is used by a non-physician, elected official involved in medicolegal death investigation ... Similarly, the title "coroner" is applied to both physicians and non-physicians ... However, in some jurisdictions the title of "Coroner" is exclusively used by physicians ...
2003 Wimbledon Championships - Seniors - Men's Singles
6–2, 7–6(7-3) It was Federer's 5th title of the year, and his 9th overall ... It was his 1st career Grand Slam title ... He became the first Swiss male player to win a Grand Slam singles title ...
Shogun - Etymology
... He became the practical ruler of Japan, and received the title sei-i taishōgun ... Thereafter, the heads of three successive shogunates received the same title ... certain conditions had to be met in order for a warlord to be bestowed the title of shogun ...

More definitions of "title":

  • (noun): An appellation signifying nobility.
    Example: "'your majesty' is the appropriate title to use in addressing a king"
  • (noun): An informal right to something.
    Example: "His title to fame"
    Synonyms: claim
  • (noun): The name of a work of art or literary composition etc..
    Example: "He looked for books with the word 'jazz' in the title"; "he refused to give titles to his paintings"; "I can never remember movie titles"
  • (noun): The status of being a champion.
    Example: "He held the title for two years"
    Synonyms: championship
  • (noun): A heading that names a statute or legislative bill; may give a brief summary of the matters it deals with.
    Example: "Title 8 provided federal help for schools"
    Synonyms: statute title, rubric
  • (noun): An identifying appellation signifying status or function: e.g. Mr. or General.
    Example: "The professor didn't like his friends to use his formal title"
    Synonyms: title of respect
  • (noun): (usually plural) written material introduced into a movie or TV show to give credits or represent dialogue or explain an action.
    Example: "The titles go by faster than I can read"
  • (verb): Designate by an identifying term.
    Synonyms: style
  • (verb): Give a title to.
    Synonyms: entitle
  • (noun): A general or descriptive heading for a section of a written work.
    Example: "The novel had chapter titles"
  • (noun): An established or recognized right.
    Example: "He had no documents confirming his title to his father's estate"
    Synonyms: claim

Famous quotes containing the word title:

    Men don’t and can’t live by exchanging articles, but by producing them. They don’t live by trade, but by work. Give up that foolish and vain title of Trades Unions; and take that of Labourers’ Unions.
    John Ruskin (1819–1900)

    And Reason kens he herits in
    A haunted house. Tenants unknown
    Assert their squalid lease of sin
    With earlier title than his own.
    Robert Bridges (1844–1930)

    The End?
    —Theodore Simonson. Irvin S. Yeaworth, Jr.. End title card, The Blob, printed on screen at the end of the movie (1958)