What is system theory?

Some articles on system, systems, system theory:

Talcott Parsons - Biography - Subscriber To System-theory, Early 1950s
... Parsons was an early subscriber to system-theory ... His interest in system-theory had been further stimulated through his contract with L.J ... Parsons called the concept of "system" for an indispensable master concept in the work of building theoretical paradigms for the social sciences ...
Systems Theory In Anthropology
... Systems Theory in Anthropology is an interdisciplinary, non-representative, non-referential, and non-Cartesian approach that brings together natural and social sciences to ... The basic idea of a system theory in social science is to solve the classical problem of duality mind-body, subject-object, form-content, signifier-signified, and structure-agenc ... System theory, therefore, suggests that instead of creating closed categories into binaries (subject-object) the system should stay open so as to allow free flow of process and interactions ...
LTI System Theory
... Linear time-invariant system theory, commonly known as LTI system theory, comes from applied mathematics and has direct applications in NMR spectroscopy, seismology, circuits, signal processing ... the response of a linear and time-invariant system to an arbitrary input signal ... Trajectories of these systems are commonly measured and tracked as they move through time (e.g ...

Famous quotes containing the words theory and/or system:

    We commonly say that the rich man can speak the truth, can afford honesty, can afford independence of opinion and action;—and that is the theory of nobility. But it is the rich man in a true sense, that is to say, not the man of large income and large expenditure, but solely the man whose outlay is less than his income and is steadily kept so.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    ... the yearly expenses of the existing religious system ... exceed in these United States twenty millions of dollars. Twenty millions! For teaching what? Things unseen and causes unknown!... Twenty millions would more than suffice to make us wise; and alas! do they not more than suffice to make us foolish?
    Frances Wright (1795–1852)