What is subject field?

Some articles on field, fields, subject field, subject fields, subject:

Sub-field Dictionary
... A sub-field dictionary is a specialized dictionary that has been designed and compiled to cover the terms of one (or possibly more) sub-fields of a ... It is therefore a sub-division of the class of dictionary called a single-field dictionary ... Sub-field dictionaries should be contrasted with multi-field dictionaries and single-field dictionaries ...
Online Dictionaries - Types - Specialized Dictionaries
... dictionary) is a lexicon that focuses upon a specific subject field ... A multi-field dictionary broadly covers several subject fields (e.g ... a business dictionary), a single-field dictionary narrowly covers one particular subject field (e.g ...
Various Aspects of Specialised Lexicography
... deals with several important aspects within the general field of lexicography ... and making bilingual dictionaries within a culture-dependent subject field involves aspects such as the user's linguistic competence in both languages as well as the user's extra-linguistic (factual ... First, the multi-field dictionary, which covers several subject-fields secondly, the single-field dictionary, which covers one subject-field and thirdly, the sub-fi ...
Single-field Dictionary
... A single-field dictionary is a specialized dictionary that has been designed and compiled to cover the terms of one particular subject field ... Single-field dictionaries should be contrasted with multi-field dictionaries and sub-field dictionaries ... First of all a single-field dictionary is an example of a very specialized dictionary in that it covers only one single subject field ...

Famous quotes containing the words field and/or subject:

    They talk about a woman’s sphere,
    As though it had a limit.
    There’s not a place in earth or heaven.
    There’s not a task to mankind given ...
    Without a woman in it.
    —Kate Field (1838–1896)

    It is the mark of an educated man to look for precision in each class of things just so far as the nature of the subject admits; it is evidently equally foolish to accept probable reasoning from a mathematician and to demand from a rhetorician demonstrative proofs.
    Aristotle (384–323 B.C.)