What is subject?

  • (adj): Possibly accepting or permitting.
    Example: "The time is fixed by the director and players and therefore subject to much variation"
    Synonyms: capable, open
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on subject, subjects:

Key Skills Qualification - England
... Those who achieved under grade C at GCSE in the corresponding subject (English, Mathematics or Information Technology respectively) are asked to take the corresponding level two Qualification ... Those who take the corresponding subjects at AS/A-level (or equivalent) are generally excluded from the external assessment in that subject, as the completion of ...
Slavoj Žižek - Thought - Ontology
... For example, Žižek employs the Cartesian subject, engages with traditional German idealism, and uses terminology from Lacan ... Žižek's adds political theory to traditional views on the subject ... we cannot understand how power functions without understanding the psychology of political subjects ...
Fansite
... may offer specialized information on the subject (e.g ... storyline plots), pictures taken from various sources, the latest news related to their subject, media downloads, links to other, similar fansites and the chance to talk to other fans ... the latest news regarding the fansite subject ...
Eastman Johnson - Subject Matter
... Johnson's subject matter included portraits of the wealthy and influential from the President of the United States, to literary figures to portraits of unnamed individuals, but he is best ... Johnson often repainted the same subject changing style or details ...
Human Relations Area Files - Distinctiveness of The HRAF Databases
... In contrast to most subject-indexing which is done at the document level, HRAF has its indexers subject index at the paragraph level ... They would discover that there is an index subject category called “Preservation and Storage of Food” (OCM 251) ... Searching by that subject category would retrieve all of the paragraphs that describe dried, smoked, pickled, refrigerated, frozen, canned, and irraditated foods, and whatever other ways the people of the given ...

More definitions of "subject":

  • (verb): Make subservient; force to submit or subdue.
    Synonyms: subjugate
  • (verb): Refer for judgment or consideration.
    Synonyms: submit
  • (noun): A person who is subjected to experimental or other observational procedures; someone who is an object of investigation.
    Synonyms: case, guinea pig
  • (verb): Make accountable for.
    Example: "He did not want to subject himself to the judgments of his superiors"
  • (noun): (grammar) one of the two main constituents of a sentence; the grammatical constituent about which something is predicated.
  • (verb): Cause to experience or suffer or make liable or vulnerable to.
    Example: "He subjected me to his awful poetry"; "The sergeant subjected the new recruits to many drills"; "People in Chernobyl were subjected to radiation"
  • (noun): The subject matter of a conversation or discussion.
    Example: "He didn't want to discuss that subject"
    Synonyms: topic, theme
  • (adj): Not exempt from tax.
    Example: "The gift will be subject to taxation"
  • (noun): A person who owes allegiance to that nation.
    Synonyms: national
  • (noun): Some situation or event that is thought about.
    Example: "He had been thinking about the subject for several years"
    Synonyms: topic, issue, matter
  • (noun): Something (a person or object or scene) selected by an artist or photographer for graphic representation.
    Example: "A moving picture of a train is more dramatic than a still picture of the same subject"
    Synonyms: content, depicted object
  • (adj): Being under the power or sovereignty of another or others.
    Example: "Subject peoples"
    Synonyms: dependent
  • (noun): (logic) the first term of a proposition.

Famous quotes containing the word subject:

    My philosophy is that to be a director you cannot be subject to anyone, even the head of the studio. I threatened to quit each time I didn’t get my way, but no one ever let me walk out.
    Dorothy Arzner (1900–1979)

    Biography, in its purer form, confined to the ended lives of the true and brave, may be held the fairest meed of human virtue—one given and received in entire disinterestedness—since neither can the biographer hope for acknowledgment from the subject, not the subject at all avail himself of the biographical distinction conferred.
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    Parents fear lest the natural love of their children may fade away. What kind of nature is that which is subject to decay? Custom is a second nature which destroys the former. But what is nature? For is custom not natural? I am much afraid that nature is itself only a first custom, as custom is a second nature.
    Blaise Pascal (1623–1662)