What is stroke?

  • (noun): A mark made by a writing implement (as in cursive writing).
    See also — Additional definitions below

Stroke

Stroke was the second most common cause of death worldwide in 2004, resulting in 5.7 million deaths (~10% of the total). Approximately 9 million people had a stroke in 2008 and 30 million people have previously had a stroke and are still alive. It is ranked after heart disease and before cancer. Geographic disparities in stroke incidence have been observed, including the existence of a "stroke belt" in the southeastern United States, but causes of these disparities have not been explained.

Read more about Stroke.

Some articles on stroke:

Basic Mechanics of Bird Flight - Flapping
... Flapping involves two stages the down-stroke, which provides the majority of the thrust, and the up-stroke, which can also (depending on the bird's wings) provide some thrust ... At each up-stroke the wing is slightly folded inwards to reduce upward resistance ... Birds change the angle of attack between the up-stroke and the down-stroke of their wings ...
List Of Volkswagen Group Petrol Engines - Four Cylinder EA827/EA113 Petrols - 1.8 R4 50kW
... centimetres (108.7 cu in) inline-four engine (R4/I4) bore x stroke 81.0 by 86.4 millimetres (3.19 in × 3.40 in), stroke ratio 0.941 - undersquare/long-stroke, 445.2 ...
Subaru 360 - Design
... named for the size of its very small air-cooled, 2-stroke inline 2-cylinder 356 cc engine mounted transversely at the rear ... By contrast, most conventional automobiles at the time used water-cooled four-stroke engines with 4 or more cylinders mounted in the front ... Two-stroke engines are lighter, simpler, easier to cold start, and produce more power for less weight because they produce power every two piston strokes, rather ...
Stroke - Research - Neuroprotection
... Brain tissue survival can be improved to some extent if one or more of these processes is inhibited ... Drugs that scavenge reactive oxygen species, inhibit apoptosis, or inhibit excitatory neurotransmitters, for example, have been shown experimentally to reduce tissue injury caused by ischemia ...
Ballistic Stroke
... In handwriting research, the concept of stroke is used in various ways ... there is a tendency to use the term stroke for a single connected component of ink (in Off-line handwriting recognition) or a complete pen-down trace (in on-line handwriting ... Thus, such stroke may be a complete character or a part of a character ...

More definitions of "stroke":

  • (noun): A light touch.
  • (verb): Strike a ball with a smooth blow.
  • (verb): Treat gingerly or carefully.
    Example: "You have to stroke the boss"
  • (noun): A single complete movement.
  • (noun): The maximum movement available to a pivoted or reciprocating piece by a cam.
    Synonyms: throw, cam stroke
  • (noun): Any one of the repeated movements of the limbs and body used for locomotion in swimming or rowing.
  • (noun): A sudden loss of consciousness resulting when the rupture or occlusion of a blood vessel leads to oxygen lack in the brain.
    Synonyms: apoplexy, cerebrovascular accident, CVA
  • (noun): The oarsman nearest the stern of the shell who sets the pace for the rest of the crew.
  • (noun): (sports) the act of swinging or striking at a ball with a club or racket or bat or cue or hand.
    Synonyms: shot
  • (noun): A light touch with the hands.
    Synonyms: stroking
  • (verb): Touch lightly and with affection, with brushing motions.
    Synonyms: fondle
  • (verb): Row at a particular rate.

Famous quotes containing the word stroke:

    Now his wars on God begin;
    At stroke of midnight God shall win.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    When any man expresses doubt to me as to the use that I or any other woman might make of the ballot if we had it, my answer is, What is that to you? If you have for years defrauded me of my rightful inheritance, and then, as a stroke of policy, of from late conviction, concluded to restore to me my own domain, must I ask you whether I may make of it a garden of flowers, or a field of wheat, or a pasture for kine?
    Matilda Joslyn Gage (1826–1898)

    All I have to do
    is hear his name
    and every hair on my body
    just bristles with desire.
    When I see
    the moon of his face,
    this frame of mine
    oozes sweat like a moonstone.
    When that man
    as dear to me as breath
    steps close enough to me
    to stroke my neck,
    the thought of jealousy
    is shattered in my heart
    that’s hard as diamond
    sometimes.
    Amaru (c. seventh century A.D.)