What is star?

  • (noun): Any celestial body visible (as a point of light) from the Earth at night.
    See also — Additional definitions below

Star

A star is a massive, luminous sphere of plasma held together by gravity. The nearest star to Earth is the Sun, which is the source of most of the energy on the planet. Other stars are visible from Earth during the night when they are not obscured by atmospheric phenomena, appearing as a multitude of fixed luminous points because of their immense distance. Historically, the most prominent stars on the celestial sphere were grouped together into constellations and asterisms, and the brightest stars gained proper names. Extensive catalogues of stars have been assembled by astronomers, which provide standardized star designations.

Read more about Star.

Some articles on star:

Xi Geminorum
... Xi Geminorum (ξ Gem) is a star in the zodiac constellation Gemini with the traditional name Alzirr ... The star has an apparent visual magnitude of 3.35, which is bright enough for it to be seen with the naked eye ... stellar classification of F5 IV, which is subgiant star that is in the process of evolving away from the main sequence of stars like the Sun ...
Data (Star Trek)
... is a character in the fictional Star Trek universe portrayed by actor Brent Spiner ... He appears in the television series Star Trek The Next Generation and the feature films Star Trek Generations, Star Trek First Contact, Star Trek Insurrection, and Star Trek Nemesis ... Data is in many ways a successor to the original Star Trek's Spock (Leonard Nimoy), in that the character offers an "outsider's" perspective on ...
Caelum - Notable Features
... See also List of stars in Caelum Caelum is a faint constellation, having no star brighter than fourth magnitude ... Its brightest star is the magnitude 4.45 α Caeli ... α Cae is a white-hued main sequence star of magnitude 4.4, 66 light-years from Earth ...
Star - Nuclear Fusion Reaction Pathways
... of different nuclear fusion reactions take place inside the cores of stars, depending upon their mass and composition, as part of stellar nucleosynthesis ... As a result the core temperature of main sequence stars only varies from 4 million kelvin for a small M-class star to 40 million kelvin for a massive O-class star ... of these reactions occur constantly, producing all the energy necessary to sustain the star's radiation output ...
Fictional Universe - Scope
... are global in scope and some, like Star Wars, Honorverse, or the Lensman series, are galactic or even intergalactic ... The classic Star Trek episode "Mirror, Mirror" introduced the Mirror Universe, in which the crew members of the Starship Enterprise were brutal rather than compassionate ... The 2009 movie Star Trek created an "alternate reality" and freed the Star Trek franchise from continuity issues ...

More definitions of "star":

  • (noun): A plane figure with 5 or more points; often used as an emblem.
  • (noun): The topology of a network whose components are connected to a hub.
    Synonyms: star topology
  • (noun): A performer who receives prominent billing.
    Synonyms: headliner
  • (verb): Be the star in a performance.
  • (noun): An actor who plays a principal role.
    Synonyms: principal, lead
  • (verb): Feature as the star.
    Example: "The movie stars Dustin Hoffman as an autistic man"
  • (noun): A star-shaped character * used in printing.
    Synonyms: asterisk
  • (verb): Mark with an asterisk.
    Example: "Linguists star unacceptable sentences"
    Synonyms: asterisk
  • (noun): (astronomy) a celestial body of hot gases that radiates energy derived from thermonuclear reactions in the interior.

Famous quotes containing the word star:

    Fear not: that ultimate Star is frail,
    only a flake of snow,
    whirled in His breath.
    Hilda Doolittle (1886–1961)

    It is the star to every wand’ring bark,
    Whose worth’s unknown, although his height be taken.
    Love’s not Time’s fool, though rosy lips and cheeks
    Within his bending sickle’s compass come;
    Love alters not with his brief hours and weeks,
    But bears it out even to the edge of doom.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    To love someone is to isolate him from the world, wipe out every trace of him, dispossess him of his shadow, drag him into a murderous future. It is to circle around the other like a dead star and absorb him into a black light.
    Jean Baudrillard (b. 1929)