What is sort?

  • (noun): A category of things distinguished by some common characteristic or quality.
    Synonyms: kind, form, variety
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on sort, sorts:

Sorted Array - Methods
... Some of them are selection sort, bubble sort, insertion sort, merge sort, quicksort, heapsort, and counting sort ...
Antidotes (album) - Recording
... so that we would get the tracks down, get all of the sort of essential parts down and then, halfway through the recording he kind of came in, and when we ...
Coggs V Bernard - Judgment
... well-known statement of the categories of bailment “ And there are six sorts of bailments ... The first sort of bailment is, a bare naked bailment of goods, delivered by one man to another to keep for the use of the bailor and this I call a depositum, and it is that ... The second sort is, when goods or chattels that are useful, are lent to a friend gratis, to be used by him and this is called commodatum, because the thing is ...
Strand Sort
... Strand sort is a sorting algorithm ... It is a comparison sort due to its use of comparisons when removing strands and when merging them into the sorted array ... The strand sort algorithm is O(n2) in the average case ...
A Sort Of Homecoming
... Several artistic works are entitled "A Sort of Homecoming." Among them are A Sort of Homecoming (song) A Sort of Homecoming (album) The phrase was coined by Paul Celan to refer to poetry ...

More definitions of "sort":

  • (noun): A person of a particular character or nature.
    Example: "What sort of person is he?"; "he's a good sort"
  • (noun): An operation that segregates items into groups according to a specified criterion.
    Synonyms: sorting
  • (noun): An approximate definition or example.
    Example: "She wore a sort of magenta dress"; "she served a creamy sort of dessert thing"

Famous quotes containing the word sort:

    I think ... I have inside me a sort of answer to the want of today: to the real, deep want of the English people, not to just what they fancy they want. And gradually, I shall get my hold on them.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    Until the end of the Middle Ages, and in many cases afterwards too, in order to obtain initiation in a trade of any sort whatever—whether that of courtier, soldier, administrator, merchant or workman—a boy did not amass the knowledge necessary to ply that trade before entering it, but threw himself into it; he then acquired the necessary knowledge.
    Philippe Ariés (20th century)

    English people apparently queue up as a sort of hobby. A family man might pass a mild autumn evening by taking the wife and kids to stand in the cinema queue for a while and then leading them over for a few minutes in the sweetshop queue and then, as a special treat for the kids, saying “Perhaps we’ve time to have a look at the Number Thirty-One bus queue before we turn in.”
    Calvin Trillin (b. 1940)