What is sort?

  • (noun): An approximate definition or example.
    Example: "She wore a sort of magenta dress"; "she served a creamy sort of dessert thing"
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on sorts, sort:

Coggs V Bernard - Judgment
... gave this well-known statement of the categories of bailment “ And there are six sorts of bailments ... The first sort of bailment is, a bare naked bailment of goods, delivered by one man to another to keep for the use of the bailor and this I call a depositum, and it is that sort of bailment which I ... The second sort is, when goods or chattels that are useful, are lent to a friend gratis, to be used by him and this is called commodatum, because the thing is to be restored in specie ...
A Sort Of Homecoming
... Several artistic works are entitled "A Sort of Homecoming." Among them are A Sort of Homecoming (song) A Sort of Homecoming (album) The phrase was coined by Paul Celan to refer to poetry ...
Strand Sort
... Strand sort is a sorting algorithm ... It is a comparison sort due to its use of comparisons when removing strands and when merging them into the sorted array ... The strand sort algorithm is O(n2) in the average case ...
Sorted Array - Methods
... Some of them are selection sort, bubble sort, insertion sort, merge sort, quicksort, heapsort, and counting sort ...
Antidotes (album) - Recording
... We kind of engineered it so that we would get the tracks down, get all of the sort of essential parts down and then, halfway through the recording he ...

More definitions of "sort":

  • (noun): A person of a particular character or nature.
    Example: "What sort of person is he?"; "he's a good sort"
  • (noun): An operation that segregates items into groups according to a specified criterion.
    Synonyms: sorting
  • (noun): A category of things distinguished by some common characteristic or quality.
    Synonyms: kind, form, variety

Famous quotes containing the word sort:

    ...some sort of false logic has crept into our schools, for the people whom I have seen doing housework or cooking know nothing of botany or chemistry, and the people who know botany and chemistry do not cook or sweep. The conclusion seems to be, if one knows chemistry she must not cook or do housework.
    Ellen Henrietta Swallow Richards (1842–1911)

    The most general deficiency in our sort of culture and education is gradually dawning on me: no one learns, no one strives towards, no one teaches—enduring loneliness.
    Friedrich Nietzsche (1844–1900)

    “The unities, sir,’ he said, “are a completeness—a kind of universal dovetailedness with regard to place and time—a sort of general oneness, if I may be allowed to use so strong an expression. I take those to be the dramatic unities, so far as I have been enabled to bestow attention upon them, and I have read much upon the subject, and thought much.”
    Charles Dickens (1812–1870)