What is social?

  • (adj): Living together or enjoying life in communities or organized groups.
    Example: "Human beings are social animals"; "spent a relaxed social evening"; "immature social behavior"
    See also — Additional definitions below

Social

The term social refers to a characteristic of living organisms as applied to populations of humans and other animals. It always refers to the interaction of organisms with other organisms and to their collective co-existence, irrespective of whether they are aware of it or not, and irrespective of whether the interaction is voluntary or involuntary.

Read more about Social.

Some articles on social:

Social Epistemology
... Social epistemology is a broad set of approaches to the study of knowledge, all of which construe human knowledge as a collective achievement ... Another way of positioning social epistemology is as the study of the social dimensions of knowledge ... One of the enduring difficulties with defining social epistemology is defining what knowledge means in this context ...
B. F. Skinner - Walden Two and Beyond Freedom and Dignity
... of that in the outside world because of their practice of scientific social planning and use of operant conditioning in the raising of children ... that does not support war or foster competition and social strife ... It encourages a lifestyle of minimal consumption, rich social relationships, personal happiness, satisfying work and leisure ...
Taxation In The United States - Payroll Taxes - Social Security and Medicare Taxes
... Federal social insurance taxes are imposed equally on employers and employees, consisting of a tax of 6.2% of wages up to an annual wage maximum ($106,800 in 2010) for Social Security plus a tax of 1.45% of total ...
Ideology and Semiotic Theory
... object that incorporates complex sets of meanings with the social agents and processes that produced them ... Foucault's 'episteme' is too narrow and abstract, not social enough ... or because of its contradictions, 'ideology' still plays a key role in semiotics oriented to social, political life" ...
Olof Palme - Political Career
... Social Democracy Development Humanism Age of Enlightenment French Revolution Utopian socialism Trade unionism Revolutions of 1848 Orthodox Marxism Revisionism Progressivism ... he was a board member of the Swedish Social Democratic Youth League and lectured at the Youth League College Bommersvik ... was elected as the new leader by the Social Democratic party congress and succeeded Erlander as Prime Minister ...

More definitions of "social":

  • (adj): Relating to or belonging to or characteristic of high society.
    Example: "Made fun of her being so social and high-toned"; "a social gossip colum"; "the society page"
  • (adj): Relating to human society and its members.
    Example: "Social institutions"; "social legislation"
    Synonyms: societal
  • (noun): A party of people assembled to promote sociability and communal activity.
    Synonyms: sociable, mixer
  • (adj): (of birds and animals) tending to move or live together in groups or colonies of the same kind.
    Example: "Ants are social insects"
    Synonyms: herding, swarming
  • (adj): Composed of sociable people or formed for the purpose of sociability.
    Example: "A purely social club"; "the church has a large social hall"; "a social director"
  • (adj): Marked by friendly companionship with others.
    Example: "A social cup of coffee"

Famous quotes containing the word social:

    Both gossip and joking are intrinsically valuable activities. Both are essentially social activities that strengthen interpersonal bonds—we do not tell jokes and gossip to ourselves. As popular activities that evade social restrictions, they often refer to topics that are inaccessible to serious public discussion. Gossip and joking often appear together: when we gossip we usually tell jokes and when we are joking we often gossip as well.
    Aaron Ben-Ze’Ev, Israeli philosopher. “The Vindication of Gossip,” Good Gossip, University Press of Kansas (1994)

    Just as modern mass production requires the standardization of commodities, so the social process requires standardization of man, and this standardization is called equality.
    Erich Fromm (1900–1980)

    I complacently accepted the social order in which I was brought up. I probably would have continued in my complacency if the happy necessity of self-support had not fallen to my lot; if self-support had not deepened and widened my contacts and my experience.
    Mary Barnett Gilson (1877–?)