What is Saturday?

  • (noun): The seventh and last day of the week; observed as the Sabbath by Jews and some Christians.
    Synonyms: Sabbatum, Sat

Saturday

Saturday (i/ˈsætərdi/ or /ˈsætərdeɪ/) is the day of the week following Friday and preceding Sunday. Saturday is the seventh and therefore last day of the week according to many commonly used calendars, but it is the second-to-last (sixth) day of the week according to ISO 8601 (see below). Its Latin name dies Saturni ("Saturn's Day") entered into Old English as Saeternesdaeg. Saturday was named no later than the 2nd century for the planet Saturn, which controlled the first hour of that day according to Vettius Valens.

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Some articles on Saturday:

Saturday - Named Days
... Black Saturday is a day named after the beginning of a tragic bushfire in Victoria, Australia ... Holy Saturday is the day before Easter ... Lazarus Saturday is the day before Palm Sunday, and is part of the Holy Week ...
Real Radio North West - Programming - Local Presenters
... Good Breakfast) David Heane (Monday–Thursday evenings, Saturday drivetime, Sunday evening) Marc Henry (Thursday Friday overnights, Saturday Sunday nights) Glen Hunt (Monday–Friday drivetime, Saturday ...
Radio Borders - Programming - Saturday
... Paul Richardson Tweedbank 0900 – 1200 Boogie's Big Saturday Show Andrew Bouglas Edinburgh 1200 – 1400 Radio Borders Hot 20 Mark Martin 1400 - 1800 Super Scoreboard Live ...
Mulund - Newspaper
... on every Wednesday.Mulund Meet is another paper of same publication publish on every Saturday ... supplement of The Times of India,published every Saturday ... Mulund Meet Newspaper, English news paper in Mulund, Published every Saturday ...
1999 AFL Season - Premiership Season - Round 3
... MCG 46,173 Friday, 9 April Essendon 22.17 (149) Sydney 9.14 (68) MCG 50,324 Saturday, 10 April Geelong 14.13 (97) Melbourne 12.19 (91) Shell Stadium 27,417 Saturday, 10 April Fremantle 11.12 (78 ...

Famous quotes containing the word saturday:

    The return of the asymmetrical Saturday was one of those small events that were interior, local, almost civic and which, in tranquil lives and closed societies, create a sort of national bond and become the favorite theme of conversation, of jokes and of stories exaggerated with pleasure: it would have been a ready- made seed for a legendary cycle, had any of us leanings toward the epic.
    Marcel Proust (1871–1922)