What is public?

  • (adj): Affecting the people or community as a whole.
    Example: "Community leaders"; "community interests"; "the public welfare"
    See also — Additional definitions below

Public

In public relations and communication science, publics are groups of individual people, and the public (a.k.a. the general public) is the totality of such groupings. This is a different concept to the sociological concept of the Öffentlichkeit or public sphere. The concept of a public has also been defined in political science, psychology, marketing, and advertising. In public relations and communication science, it is one of the more ambiguous concepts in the field. Although it has definitions in the theory of the field that have been formulated from the early 20th century onwards, it has suffered in more recent years from being blurred, as a result of conflation of the idea of a public with the notions of audience, market segment, community, constituency, and stakeholder.

Read more about Public.

Some articles on public:

Uncertainty and The Media
... in science, and science in general, is often interpreted much differently in the public sphere than in the scientific community ... This is due in part to the diversity of the public audience, and the tendency for scientists to misunderstand lay audiences and therefore not communicate ideas ... Also, in the public realm, there are often many scientific voices giving input on a single topic ...
Zookeeper
... They may also be involved in scientific research or public education, such as conducting tours and answering questions ... conservation or to be displayed to the public ... Zoos are open to the public and are visited by all varieties of people and ages, and zookeepers must also entertain and inform the zoo’s visitors ...
Decentralised Governance - Administrative Decentralization
... and financial resources for providing public services among different levels of governance ... It is the transfer of responsibility for the planning, financing and management of public functions from the central government or regional governments and its agencies to local governments, semi-autonomous public ...
Xcel Energy
... is a public utility company based in Minneapolis, Minnesota, serving more than 3.3 million electric customers and 1.8 million natural gas customers in eight states Colorado, Michigan, Minnesota, New Mexico, North ... Operating companies include Northern States Power Company, Public Service Company of Colorado, and Southwestern Public Service Co ...
Tibetan Buddhism - General Methods of Practice - Esotericism
... A depiction of a mandala may be less public than that of a deity ... That of a higher tantric deity may be less public than that of a lower ... The degree to which information on Vajrayāna is now public in western languages is controversial among Tibetan Buddhists ...

More definitions of "public":

  • (adj): Not private; open to or concerning the people as a whole.
    Example: "The public good"; "public libraries"; "public funds"; "public parks"; "a public scandal"; "public gardens"; "performers and members of royal families are public figures"
  • (noun): A body of people sharing some common interest.
    Example: "The reading public"
  • (noun): People in general considered as a whole.
    Example: "He is a hero in the eyes of the public"
    Synonyms: populace, world

Famous quotes containing the word public:

    The average Kentuckian may appear a bit confused in his knowledge of history, but he is firmly certain about current politics. Kentucky cannot claim first place in political importance, but it tops the list in its keen enjoyment of politics for its own sake. It takes the average Kentuckian only a matter of moments to dispose of the weather and personal helath, but he never tires of a political discussion.
    —For the State of Kentucky, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    The story is told of a man who, seeing one of the thoroughbred stables for the first time, suddenly removed his hat and said in awed tones, “My Lord! The cathedral of the horse.”
    —For the State of Kentucky, U.S. public relief program (1935-1943)

    It was a time of madness, the sort of mad-hysteria that always presages war. There seems to be nothing left but war—when any population in any sort of a nation gets violently angry, civilization falls down and religion forsakes its hold on the consciences of human kind in such times of public madness.
    Rebecca Latimer Felton (1835–1930)