What is property?

  • (noun): Something owned; any tangible or intangible possession that is owned by someone.
    Example: "That hat is my property"; "he is a man of property"
    Synonyms: belongings, holding, material possession
    See also — Additional definitions below

Property

Property is any physical or intangible entity that is owned by a person or jointly by a group of people or a legal entity like a corporation. Depending on the nature of the property, an owner of property has the right to consume, sell, rent, mortgage, transfer, exchange or destroy it, or to exclude others from doing these things.

Read more about Property.

Some articles on property:

Defining An Emergency
... the incident should be one of the following Immediately threatening to life, health, property or environment ... Have already caused loss of life, health detriments, property damage or environmental damage Have a high probability of escalating to cause immediate danger to life, health, property or ... as "a condition where life, health or property is in jeopardy, and the prompt summoning of aid is essential." Whilst most emergency services agree on protecting human health, life and property ...
Women's Rights - Property Rights
... United States and Britain began to challenge laws that denied them the right to their property once they married ... in the United States and the British Parliament began passing statutes that protected women's property from their husbands and their husbands' creditors ... laws were known as the Married Women's Property Acts ...
History of Suffrage Around The World - New Zealand
... British subjects aged 21 or over who owned or rented sufficient property, and were not imprisoned for a serious offence ... Communally owned land was excluded from the property qualification, thus disenfranchising most Māori (indigenous) men ... to holders of miner's licenses who met all voting qualifications except that of property ...
Property in Philosophy - Contemporary Views
... Among contemporary political thinkers who believe that natural persons enjoy rights to own property and to enter into contracts, there are two views ... of capitalist market economy is the functioning state protection of property rights in a formal property system where ownership and transactions are clearly recorded ... These property rights and the whole formal system of property make possible Greater independence for individuals from local community arrangements to protect their assets ...
Regulatory Taking
... Regulatory taking refers to a situation in which a government regulates a property to such a degree that the regulation effectively amounts to an exercise of the government's eminent domain power ...

More definitions of "property":

  • (noun): Any movable articles or objects used on the set of a play or movie.
    Synonyms: prop
  • (noun): A basic or essential attribute shared by all members of a class.
    Example: "A study of the physical properties of atomic particles"
  • (noun): A construct whereby objects or individuals can be distinguished.
    Example: "Self-confidence is not an endearing property"
    Synonyms: attribute, dimension
  • (noun): Any area set aside for a particular purpose.
    Example: "The president was concerned about the property across from the White House"
    Synonyms: place

Famous quotes containing the word property:

    By rendering the labor of one, the property of the other, they cherish pride, luxury, and vanity on one side; on the other, vice and servility, or hatred and revolt.
    James Madison (1751–1836)

    General education is the best preventive of the evils now most dreaded. In the civilized countries of the world, the question is how to distribute most generally and equally the property of the world. As a rule, where education is most general the distribution of property is most general.... As knowledge spreads, wealth spreads. To diffuse knowledge is to diffuse wealth. To give all an equal chance to acquire knowledge is the best and surest way to give all an equal chance to acquire property.
    Rutherford Birchard Hayes (1822–1893)

    Children are potentially free and their life directly embodies nothing save potential freedom. Consequently they are not things and cannot be the property either of their parents or others.
    Georg Wilhelm Friedrich Hegel (1770–1831)