What is polytechnic high school?

Polytechnic High School

Polytechnic High School, or Poly High School, is a common name given to high schools, especially high schools with a focus on applied arts and sciences.

In the United States Polytechnic High School may refer to (by state);

Read more about Polytechnic High School.

Some articles on polytechnic high school:

Glenn Davis Award - Past Winners
... Season Player Position High school College 1987 Russell White RB Crespi Carmelite High School California 1988 Derek Brown RB Servite High School Nebraska 1989 Kevin Copeland WR ... North High School USC 1996 Antoine Harris TE/DE Loyola High School USC 1997 DeShaun Foster RB/DB Tustin High School UCLA 1998 Chris Lewis QB Long Beach Polytechnic High School Stanford 1999 Matt ... Bonaventure High School USC 2003 Brigham Harwell DL/FB Los Altos High School UCLA 2004 DeSean Jackson WR Long Beach Polytechnic High School California 2005 Toby Gerhart RB Norco High School Stanford 2006 Aaron ...
List Of Institutions Using The Term "institute Of Technology" Or "polytechnic" - Secondary Education
... There are also secondary education schools using that word Long Beach Polytechnic High School, Long Beach, California, USA Benson Polytechnic High School, Portland, Oregon, USA Polytechnic School, Pasadena ... This began as the business department of Los Angeles High School in the 1890s, and became a separate school in 1906 ... Baltimore Polytechnic Institute, Baltimore, Maryland, USA ...
Polytechnic High School - See Also
... Polytechnic (disambiguation) Polytechnic Secondary School. ...

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