What is Oxford?

  • (noun): A low shoe laced over the instep.
    See also — Additional definitions below

Oxford

Oxford i/ˈɒksfərd/ is a city in central southern England. It is the county town of Oxfordshire, and forms a district within the county. It has a population of just under 165,000, of whom 153,900 live within the district boundary.

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Some articles on Oxford:

Hertford College, Oxford - Notable Former Students
... Hebraist, philologist Henry Pelham, British Whig Prime Minister John Selden, jurist, MP for Oxford University Jonathan Swift, satirist, poet, Anglican priest, author of Gulliver's Travels Magdalen Hall, old site ... author of This Boy's Life See also CategoryAlumni of Hertford College, Oxford ...
Clarendon Building
... The Clarendon Building is a landmark Grade I listed building in Oxford, England, owned by the University of Oxford ... It was built between 1711 and 1715 to house the Oxford University Press ... the building of the Clarendon Laboratory in Oxford ...
John Lucas (philosopher) - Career Highlights
... Attended Balliol College, Oxford on a scholarship ... Harmsworth Senior Scholar, Merton College, Oxford ... John Locke Scholarship, Oxford University ...
Unetice Culture - Sources
... Cunliffe (ed.), The Oxford illustrated prehistory of Europe (Oxford, Oxford University Press 1994) ...
Oxford, New York (disambiguation)
... Oxford, New York is the name of two locations in Chenango County, New York Town of Oxford Village of Oxford ...

More definitions of "Oxford":

  • (noun): A city in southern England northwest of London; site of Oxford University.
  • (noun): A university town in northern Mississippi; home of William Faulkner.

Famous quotes containing the word oxford:

    The greatest gift that Oxford gives her sons is, I truly believe, a genial irreverence toward learning, and from that irreverence love may spring.
    Robertson Davies (b. 1913)

    The logical English train a scholar as they train an engineer. Oxford is Greek factory, as Wilton mills weave carpet, and Sheffield grinds steel. They know the use of a tutor, as they know the use of a horse; and they draw the greatest amount of benefit from both. The reading men are kept by hard walking, hard riding, and measured eating and drinking, at the top of their condition, and two days before the examination, do not work but lounge, ride, or run, to be fresh on the college doomsday.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)