What is mental process?

Mental Process

Mental processes, mental functions and cognitive processes are terms often used interchangeably (although not always correctly so, the term cognitive tends to have specific implications – see cognitive and cognitivism) to mean such functions or processes as perception, introspection, memory, creativity, imagination, conception, belief, reasoning, volition, and emotion—in other words, all the different things that we can do with our minds.

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Some articles on mental process:

Gregory Bateson - Work - Other Terms Used By Bateson
... comparative anatomy), especially in complex organic (or mental) systems ... Philosopher/Logician Charles Sanders Peirce, who used it to refer to the process by which scientific hypotheses are generated ... Mental process requires collateral energy ...
Mental Process
... Mental processes, mental functions and cognitive processes are terms often used interchangeably (although not always correctly so, the term cognitive tends to have specific ... A specific instance of engaging in a cognitive process is a mental event ... something is, of course, different from the entire process, or faculty, of perception—one's ability to perceive things ...
Emergent Evolution - Alexander and The Emergence of Mind
... relationship between lower and higher, was taken up by Samuel Alexander, who argued that the mental process is not reducible to the neural processes on which it depends at the physical-material ... Further, the neural process that expressed mental process itself possesses a quality (mind) that the other neural processes don’t ... At the same time, the mental process, because it is functionally identical to this particular neural process, is also a vital one ...

Famous quotes containing the words process and/or mental:

    I wish to see, in process of disappearing, that only thing which ever could bring this nation to civil war.
    Abraham Lincoln (1809–1865)

    The worker can unionize, go out on strike; mothers are divided from each other in homes, tied to their children by compassionate bonds; our wildcat strikes have most often taken the form of physical or mental breakdown.
    Adrienne Rich (b. 1929)