What is mental process?

Mental Process

Mental processes, mental functions and cognitive processes are terms often used interchangeably (although not always correctly so, the term cognitive tends to have specific implications – see cognitive and cognitivism) to mean such functions or processes as perception, introspection, memory, creativity, imagination, conception, belief, reasoning, volition, and emotion—in other words, all the different things that we can do with our minds.

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Some articles on mental process:

Gregory Bateson - Work - Other Terms Used By Bateson
... (as in, for example, comparative anatomy), especially in complex organic (or mental) systems ... coined by American Philosopher/Logician Charles Sanders Peirce, who used it to refer to the process by which scientific hypotheses are generated ... Mental process requires collateral energy ...
Emergent Evolution - Alexander and The Emergence of Mind
... between lower and higher, was taken up by Samuel Alexander, who argued that the mental process is not reducible to the neural processes on which it depends at the physical-material level ... Further, the neural process that expressed mental process itself possesses a quality (mind) that the other neural processes don’t ... At the same time, the mental process, because it is functionally identical to this particular neural process, is also a vital one ...
Mental Process
... Mental processes, mental functions and cognitive processes are terms often used interchangeably (although not always correctly so, the term cognitive tends to have specific implications – see ... A specific instance of engaging in a cognitive process is a mental event ... The event of perceiving something is, of course, different from the entire process, or faculty, of perception—one's ability to perceive things ...

Famous quotes containing the words process and/or mental:

    Any balance we achieve between adult and parental identities, between children’s and our own needs, works only for a time—because, as one father says, “It’s a new ball game just about every week.” So we are always in the process of learning to be parents.
    Joan Sheingold Ditzion, Dennie, and Palmer Wolf. Ourselves and Our Children, by Boston Women’s Health Book Collective, ch. 2 (1978)

    One who shows signs of mental aberration is, inevitably, perhaps, but cruelly, shut off from familiar, thoughtless intercourse, partly excommunicated; his isolation is unwittingly proclaimed to him on every countenance by curiosity, indifference, aversion, or pity, and in so far as he is human enough to need free and equal communication and feel the lack of it, he suffers pain and loss of a kind and degree which others can only faintly imagine, and for the most part ignore.
    Charles Horton Cooley (1864–1929)