What is meet?

  • (verb): Satisfy a condition or restriction.
    Example: "Does this paper meet the requirements for the degree?"
    Synonyms: fit, conform to
    See also — Additional definitions below

More definitions of "meet":

  • (verb): Undergo or suffer.
    Example: "Meet a violent death"
    Synonyms: suffer
  • (verb): Be in direct physical contact with; make contact.
    Synonyms: touch, adjoin, contact
  • (verb): Satisfy or fulfill.
    Example: "Meet a need"
    Synonyms: match, cope with
  • (verb): Contend against an opponent in a sport, game, or battle.
    Synonyms: encounter, play, take on
  • (verb): Meet by design; be present at the arrival of.
    Example: "Can you meet me at the train station?"
  • (adj): Being precisely fitting and right.
    Example: "It is only meet that she should be seated first"
    Synonyms: fitting
  • (noun): A meeting at which a number of athletic contests are held.
    Synonyms: sports meeting
  • (verb): Get together socially or for a specific purpose.
    Synonyms: get together
  • (verb): Be adjacent or come together.
    Synonyms: converge
  • (verb): Get to know; get acquainted with.
    Example: "I met this really handsome guy at a bar last night!"; "we met in Singapore"

Famous quotes containing the word meet:

    That devilish Iron Horse, whose ear-rending neigh is heard throughout the town, has muddied the Boiling Spring with his foot, and he it is that has browsed off all the woods on Walden shore, that Trojan horse, with a thousand men in his belly, introduced by mercenary Greeks! Where is the country’s champion, the Moore of Moore Hall, to meet him at the Deep Cut and thrust an avenging lance between the ribs of the bloated pest?
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    Jaques. Let’s meet as little as we can.
    Orlando. I do desire we may be better strangers.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    I fell her finger light
    Laid pausefully upon life’s headlong train;—
    The foot less prompt to meet the morning dew,
    The heart less bounding at emotion new,
    And hope, once crush’d, less quick to spring again.
    Matthew Arnold (1822–1888)