What is meet?

  • (verb): Meet by design; be present at the arrival of.
    Example: "Can you meet me at the train station?"
    See also — Additional definitions below

More definitions of "meet":

  • (verb): Be adjacent or come together.
    Synonyms: converge
  • (verb): Contend against an opponent in a sport, game, or battle.
    Synonyms: encounter, play, take on
  • (adj): Being precisely fitting and right.
    Example: "It is only meet that she should be seated first"
    Synonyms: fitting
  • (verb): Be in direct physical contact with; make contact.
    Synonyms: touch, adjoin, contact
  • (verb): Get together socially or for a specific purpose.
    Synonyms: get together
  • (verb): Satisfy a condition or restriction.
    Example: "Does this paper meet the requirements for the degree?"
    Synonyms: fit, conform to
  • (verb): Undergo or suffer.
    Example: "Meet a violent death"
    Synonyms: suffer
  • (noun): A meeting at which a number of athletic contests are held.
    Synonyms: sports meeting
  • (verb): Get to know; get acquainted with.
    Example: "I met this really handsome guy at a bar last night!"; "we met in Singapore"
  • (verb): Satisfy or fulfill.
    Example: "Meet a need"
    Synonyms: match, cope with

Famous quotes containing the word meet:

    England has the most sordid literary scene I’ve ever seen. They all meet in the same pub. This guy’s writing a foreword for this person. They all have to give radio programs, they have to do all this just in order to scrape by. They’re all scratching each other’s backs.
    William Burroughs (b. 1914)

    O the joy of the strong-brawn’d fighter, towering in the arena in perfect condition, conscious of power, thirsting to meet his opponent.
    Walt Whitman (1819–1892)

    There are two kinds of timidity—timidity of mind, and timidity of the nerves; physical timidity, and moral timidity. Each is independent of the other. The body may be frightened and quake while the mind remains calm and bold, and vice versë. This is the key to many eccentricities of conduct. When both kinds meet in the same man he will be good for nothing all his life.
    Honoré De Balzac (1799–1850)