What is legal philosophy?

  • (noun): The branch of philosophy concerned with the law and the principles that lead courts to make the decisions they do.
    Synonyms: jurisprudence, law

Some articles on legal philosophy, legal, philosophy:

Conventionalism - Legal Philosophy
... Conventionalism, as applied to legal philosophy, provides a justification for state coercion ... It is one of the three rival conceptions of law constructed by American legal philosopher Ronald Dworkin in his work Law's Empire ... The other two conceptions of law are legal pragmatism and law as integrity ...
List Of Harvard Law School Alumni - Academia - Legal Academia - Legal Philosophy
... Randy Barnett, libertarian legal theorist Ronald Dworkin, legal and political philosopher Richard Posner (LL.B ...
Cass Sunstein - Views - Legal Philosophy
... will sometimes produce an inadequate understanding of how people will respond to legal intervention ...
Brian Leiter - Philosophy
... Leiter's scholarly writings have been in two main areas legal philosophy and Continental philosophy ... In legal philosophy, he has offered a reinterpretation of the American Legal Realists as prescient philosophical naturalists and a general defense of what he calls "naturalize ... In his writing on German philosophy, Leiter defends a reading of Nietzsche as a philosophical naturalist, most notably in Nietzsche on Morality (London Routledge, 2002 ...

Famous quotes containing the words philosophy and/or legal:

    I would love to meet a philosopher like Nietzsche on a train or boat and to talk with him all night. Incidentally, I don’t consider his philosophy long-lived. It is not so much persuasive as full of bravura.
    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860–1904)

    Lawyers are necessary in a community. Some of you ... take a different view; but as I am a member of that legal profession, or was at one time, and have only lost standing in it to become a politician, I still retain the pride of the profession. And I still insist that it is the law and the lawyer that make popular government under a written constitution and written statutes possible.
    William Howard Taft (1857–1930)