What is legal philosophy?

  • (noun): The branch of philosophy concerned with the law and the principles that lead courts to make the decisions they do.
    Synonyms: jurisprudence, law

Some articles on legal philosophy, legal, philosophy:

Brian Leiter - Philosophy
... In legal philosophy, he has offered a reinterpretation of the American Legal Realists as prescient philosophical naturalists and a general defense of what he ... In his writing on German philosophy, Leiter defends a reading of Nietzsche as a philosophical naturalist, most notably in Nietzsche on Morality (London Routledge, 2002 ... These include Nietzsche (Oxford Readings in Philosophy, 2001) (with John Richardson), Objectivity in Law and Morals (Cambridge Cambridge University Press, 2001 ...
Conventionalism - Legal Philosophy
... Conventionalism, as applied to legal philosophy, provides a justification for state coercion ... It is one of the three rival conceptions of law constructed by American legal philosopher Ronald Dworkin in his work Law's Empire ... The other two conceptions of law are legal pragmatism and law as integrity ...
List Of Harvard Law School Alumni - Academia - Legal Academia - Legal Philosophy
... Randy Barnett, libertarian legal theorist Ronald Dworkin, legal and political philosopher Richard Posner (LL.B ...
Cass Sunstein - Views - Legal Philosophy
... Sunstein is a proponent of judicial minimalism, arguing that judges should focus primarily on deciding the case at hand, and avoid making sweeping changes to the law or decisions that have broad-reaching effects ... Some view him as liberal, despite Sunstein's public support for George W ...

Famous quotes containing the words philosophy and/or legal:

    Ordinary people seem not to realize that those who really apply themselves in the right way to philosophy are directly and of their own accord preparing themselves for dying and death.
    Socrates (469–399 B.C.)

    Narrative prose is a legal wife, while drama is a posturing, boisterous, cheeky and wearisome mistress.
    Anton Pavlovich Chekhov (1860–1904)