What is ledger?

Ledger

A ledger is the principal book or computer file for recording and totaling monetary transactions by account, with debits and credits in separate columns and a beginning balance and ending balance for each account.

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Some articles on ledger:

Subledger
... The subledger, or subsidiary ledger, is a subset of the general ledger used in accounting ... The total of the subledger would match the line item amount on the general ledger ... This corresponding line item in the general ledger is referred to as the controlling account ...
Ledger Art - Subject Matter
... Battle exploits dominated ledger art ... Ledger artists also documented their rapidly changing environment by portraying encroaching European Americans and new technologies such as trains and cameras ... Many ledger artists worked with ethnologists, by documenting shield and tipi designs, ethnobotanical information, winter counts, dance customs and regalia, and other cultural information ...
Anthony St Ledger
... Anthony James Joseph St Ledger (18 February 1859 – 17 April 1929) was an English-born Australian politician ... St Ledger died in 1929 ...
Origin of The Term Ledger
... Originally, a ledger was a large volume of scripture/service book kept in one place in church and accessible ... curates should provide a booke of the bible in Englishe, of the largest volume, to be a ledger in the same church for the parishioners to read on ...
Ledger Art
... Ledger art is a term for Plains Indian narrative drawing or painting on paper or cloth ... Ledger art flourished primarily from the 1860s to the 1920s ... A revival of ledger art began in the 1960s and 1970s ...

More definitions of "ledger":

  • (noun): An accounting journal as a physical object.
    Synonyms: daybook

Famous quotes containing the word ledger:

    In considering the ledger equal, understand the greatest gift you have given your parents is the opportunity to raise you. The things a child gets from parents can’t compare to the things a parent gets from raising a child. Only by experiencing this can you understand the degree to which children give meaning to parents’ lives.
    Frank Pittman (20th century)

    Life is constantly providing us with new funds, new resources, even when we are reduced to immobility. In life’s ledger there is no such thing as frozen assets.
    Henry Miller (1891–1980)