What is lap up?

  • (verb): Take up with the tongue.
    Synonyms: lap, lick

Some articles on lap, laps:

1985 British Grand Prix
... speed of 160.9 mph (258.9 km/h), Keke Rosberg's qualifying lap remained the fastest in F1 history until 2002 ... On the first lap right after the start, 4 cars went out at Copse ... made an excellent start from fourth on the grid, had been leading almost every lap since lap 1, but eventually retired with fuel problems) for much of the second ...
1998 Brazilian Grand Prix - Race Summary
... into the lead, and took off for a long and lonely drive, leading every lap of the Grand Prix ... On lap one Häkkinen led David Coulthard by over a second, and was three seconds ahead of Heinz-Harald Frentzen in third, Ralf Schumacher spun out on the first lap at the fourth ... On lap 18 Coulthard was 5 seconds behind Häkkinen ...
1983 Formula One Season - FIA World Championship Season Review - Early Season
... could well be attributed to his magnificent start, which left him 14th at the end of the first lap ... Tambay started the race from pole, and he led until lap 25 from Rosberg, who had made easy work early in the race of both the other Ferrari of René Arnoux and his own teammate ... Laffite, now even closer than before, attempted to pass his teammate later on the same lap ...
1999 Austrian Grand Prix - Classification
... Pos No Driver Constructor Laps Time/Retired Grid Points 4 ... Eddie Irvine Ferrari 71 12812.438 2 ... David Coulthard McLaren-Mercedes 71 +0.313 1 ... Mika Häkkinen ...
1989 Formula One Season - Race-by-race - Race Sixteen: Australia
... Prost elected to withdraw at the end of the first lap in such torrentially wet conditions and would score no points ... Starting from pole, by lap ten he had over 30 seconds to the Williams pair and counting ... On lap 13, he ran into the rear of Brundle's Brabham and was out of the race ...

Famous quotes containing the word lap:

    Earth fills her lap with pleasures of her own;
    William Wordsworth (1770–1850)

    Beatrice. Will you go hear this news, signor?
    Benedick. I will live in thy heart, die in thy lap and be buried in thy eyes; and moreover, I will go with thee to thy uncle’s.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)