What is ladder?

  • (noun): Ascending stages by which somebody or something can progress.
    Example: "He climbed the career ladder"
    See also — Additional definitions below

Ladder

A ladder is a vertical or inclined set of rungs or steps. There are two types: rigid ladders that can be leaned against a vertical surface such as a wall, and rope ladders that are hung from the top. The vertical members of a rigid ladder are called stringers or rails (US) or stiles (UK). Rigid ladders are usually portable, but some types are permanently fixed to buildings. They are commonly made of metal, wood, or fibreglass, but they have been known to be made of tough plastic.

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Some articles on ladder:

Ladder - Superstition
... It is commonly said that walking under a ladder is bad luck ... A natural explanation would be that an erected ladder most likely meant that someone was working above and to pass under it would make a person susceptible to injuries due to falling objects ...

More definitions of "ladder":

  • (noun): A row of unravelled stitches.
    Synonyms: run, ravel
  • (verb): Come unraveled or undone as if by snagging.
    Synonyms: run
  • (noun): Steps consisting of two parallel members connected by rungs; for climbing up or down.

Famous quotes containing the word ladder:

    But ‘tis a common proof
    That lowliness is young ambition’s ladder,
    Whereto the climber-upward turns his face;
    But when he once attains the upmost round
    He then unto the ladder turns his back,
    Looks in the clouds, scorning the base degrees
    By which he did ascend.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    This monument, so imposing and tasteful, fittingly typifies the grand and symmetrical character of him in whose honor it has been builded. His was “the arduous greatness of things done.” No friendly hands constructed and placed for his ambition a ladder upon which he might climb. His own brave hands framed and nailed the cleats upon which he climbed to the heights of public usefulness and fame.
    Benjamin Harrison (1833–1901)

    O, when degree is shaked,
    Which is the ladder of all high designs,
    The enterprise is sick. How could communities,
    Degrees in schools, and brotherhoods in cities,
    Peaceful commerce from dividable shores,
    The primogeniture and due of birth,
    Prerogative of age, crowns, scepters, laurels,
    But by degree stand in authentic place?
    Take but degree away, untune that string,
    And hark what discord follows. Each thing meets
    In mere oppugnancy.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)