What is ladder?

  • (noun): A row of unravelled stitches.
    Synonyms: run, ravel
    See also — Additional definitions below

Ladder

A ladder is a vertical or inclined set of rungs or steps. There are two types: rigid ladders that can be leaned against a vertical surface such as a wall, and rope ladders that are hung from the top. The vertical members of a rigid ladder are called stringers or rails (US) or stiles (UK). Rigid ladders are usually portable, but some types are permanently fixed to buildings. They are commonly made of metal, wood, or fibreglass, but they have been known to be made of tough plastic.

Read more about Ladder.

Some articles on ladder:

Ladder - Superstition
... It is commonly said that walking under a ladder is bad luck ... A natural explanation would be that an erected ladder most likely meant that someone was working above and to pass under it would make a person susceptible to injuries due to falling objects ...

More definitions of "ladder":

  • (noun): Steps consisting of two parallel members connected by rungs; for climbing up or down.
  • (noun): Ascending stages by which somebody or something can progress.
    Example: "He climbed the career ladder"
  • (verb): Come unraveled or undone as if by snagging.
    Synonyms: run

Famous quotes containing the word ladder:

    Take motherhood: nobody ever thought of putting it on a moral pedestal until some brash feminists pointed out, about a century ago, that the pay is lousy and the career ladder nonexistent.
    Barbara Ehrenreich (b. 1941)

    A funny business, a woman’s career. The things you drop on your way up the ladder so you can move faster. You forget you’ll need them again when you get back to being a woman.
    Joseph L. Mankiewicz (1909–1993)

    This monument, so imposing and tasteful, fittingly typifies the grand and symmetrical character of him in whose honor it has been builded. His was “the arduous greatness of things done.” No friendly hands constructed and placed for his ambition a ladder upon which he might climb. His own brave hands framed and nailed the cleats upon which he climbed to the heights of public usefulness and fame.
    Benjamin Harrison (1833–1901)