What is iron?

  • (adj): Extremely robust.
    Example: "An iron constitution"
    Synonyms: cast-iron
    See also — Additional definitions below

Iron

Iron is a chemical element with the symbol Fe (from Latin: ferrum) and atomic number 26. It is a metal in the first transition series. It is the most common element (by mass) forming the planet Earth as a whole, forming much of Earth's outer and inner core. It is the fourth most common element in the Earth's crust. Iron's very common presence in rocky planets like Earth is due to its abundant production as a result of fusion in high-mass stars, where the production of nickel-56 (which decays to the most common isotope of iron) is the last nuclear fusion reaction that is exothermic. This causes radioactive nickel to become the last element to be produced before collapse of a supernova leads to the explosive events that scatter this precursor radionuclide of iron abundantly into space.

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Some articles on iron:

Iron - Precautions
... NFPA 1 ... Fire diamond for powdered iron metal Large amounts of ingested iron can cause excessive levels of iron in the blood ... High blood levels of free ferrous iron react with peroxides to produce free radicals, which are highly reactive and can damage DNA, proteins, lipids, and ... Thus, iron toxicity occurs when there is free iron in the cell, which generally occurs when iron levels exceed the capacity of transferrin to bind the ...

More definitions of "iron":

  • (verb): Press and smooth with a heated iron.
    Synonyms: iron out
  • (noun): Implement used to brand live stock.
    Synonyms: branding iron
  • (noun): A heavy ductile magnetic metallic element; is silver-white in pure form but readily rusts; used in construction and tools and armament; plays a role in the transport of oxygen by the blood.
    Synonyms: Fe, atomic number 26
  • (noun): Home appliance consisting of a flat metal base that is heated and used to smooth cloth.
    Synonyms: smoothing iron
  • (noun): A golf club that has a relatively narrow metal head.

Famous quotes containing the word iron:

    Along the iron veins that traverse the frame of our country, beat and flow the fiery pulses of its exertion, hotter and faster every hour. All vitality is concentrated through those throbbing arteries into the central cities; the country is passed over like a green sea by narrow bridges, and we are thrown back in continually closer crowds on the city gates.
    John Ruskin (1819–1900)

    It was then that the iron entered my soul.
    Margaret Thatcher (b. 1925)

    When I say artist I don’t mean in the narrow sense of the word—but the man who is building things—creating molding the earth—whether it be the plains of the west—or the iron ore of Penn. It’s all a big game of construction—some with a brush—some with a shovel—some choose a pen.
    Jackson Pollock (1912–1956)