What is Greek?

  • (noun): A native or inhabitant of Greece.
    Synonyms: Hellene
    See also — Additional definitions below

Greek

Greek may refer to anything related to:

Read more about Greek.

Some articles on Greek:

4th Century In Poetry
... Etruria, writing in Latin Nonnus, Egypt, writing in Greek Quintus Smyrnaeus, writing in Greek Tryphiodorus, Egypt, writing in Greek Palladas, Alexandria ...
Satyr - In Greek Mythology and Art
... In earlier Greek art, satyrs appear as old and ugly, but in later art, especially in works of the Attic school, this savage characteristic is softened into a more youthful and graceful aspect ... of the Satyr appears throughout late Greek art ... Greek spirits known as Calicantsars have a noticeable resemblance to the ancient satyrs they have goats' ears and the feet of donkeys or goats or horses, are covered with hair ...
Greek - Other
... Greek may also refer to Greeks (finance), the Greeks epresenting the sensitivities of derivatives (the most common of these sensitivities are often denoted by Greek ...
Dionysius Thrax
... Dionysius Thrax (Ancient Greek Διονύσιος ὁ Θρᾷξ) (170 BC – 90 BC) was a Hellenistic grammarian and a pupil of Aristarchus of Samothrace ... The first extant grammar of Greek, "Art of Grammar" (Tékhnē grammatiké, Greek τέχνη γραμματική) is attributed to him but many scholars today ... It concerns itself primarily with a morphological description of Greek, lacking any treatment of syntax ...
Nicaea - Ruins
... Some of the towers have Greek inscriptions ... being full of the fragments of ancient Greek, Roman and Byzantine temples and churches ... The Church of the Dormition, the principal Greek Orthodox church in Nicaea, was one of the most architecturaly important Byzantine churches in Asia Minor ...

More definitions of "Greek":

  • (adj): Of or relating to or characteristic of Greece or the Greeks.
    Example: "Greek mythology"
    Synonyms: Grecian, Hellenic

Famous quotes containing the word greek:

    Here Greek and Roman find themselves
    Alive along these crowded shelves;
    And Shakespeare treads again his stage,
    And Chaucer paints anew his age.
    John Greenleaf Whittier (1807–1892)

    Can it be, that the Greek grammarians invented their dual number for the particular benefit of twins?
    Herman Melville (1819–1891)

    Not like the brazen giant of Greek fame,
    With conquering limbs astride from land to land,
    Here at our sea-washed, sunset gates shall stand
    A mighty woman with a torch, whose flame
    Is the imprisoned lightning, and her name
    Mother of Exiles. From her beacon-hand
    Glows world-wide welcome; her mild eyes command
    The air-bridged harbor that twin cities frame.
    Emma Lazarus (1849–1887)