What is Greek?

  • (noun): A native or inhabitant of Greece.
    Synonyms: Hellene
    See also — Additional definitions below


Greek may refer to anything related to:

Read more about Greek.

Some articles on Greek:

4th Century In Poetry
... Dates Unknown Avienus, Volsinii, Etruria, writing in Latin Nonnus, Egypt, writing in Greek Quintus Smyrnaeus, writing in Greek Tryphiodorus, Egypt, writing in Greek ...
Dionysius Thrax
... Dionysius Thrax (Ancient Greek Διονύσιος ὁ Θρᾷξ) (170 BC – 90 BC) was a Hellenistic grammarian and a pupil of Aristarchus of Samothrace ... The first extant grammar of Greek, "Art of Grammar" (Tékhnē grammatiké, Greek τέχνη γραμματική) is attributed to him but many scholars today doubt that the work really belongs ... It concerns itself primarily with a morphological description of Greek, lacking any treatment of syntax ...
Nicaea - Ruins
... Some of the towers have Greek inscriptions ... era Nicaea, the walls of the ruined mosques and baths being full of the fragments of ancient Greek, Roman and Byzantine temples and churches ... The Church of the Dormition, the principal Greek Orthodox church in Nicaea, was one of the most architecturaly important Byzantine churches in Asia Minor ...
Greek - Other
... Greek may also refer to Greeks (finance), the Greeks epresenting the sensitivities of derivatives (the most common of these sensitivities are often denoted ...
Satyr - In Greek Mythology and Art
... In earlier Greek art, satyrs appear as old and ugly, but in later art, especially in works of the Attic school, this savage characteristic is softened into a more ... This transformation or humanization of the Satyr appears throughout late Greek art ... Greek spirits known as Calicantsars have a noticeable resemblance to the ancient satyrs they have goats' ears and the feet of donkeys or goats or horses ...

More definitions of "Greek":

  • (adj): Of or relating to or characteristic of Greece or the Greeks.
    Example: "Greek mythology"
    Synonyms: Grecian, Hellenic

Famous quotes containing the word greek:

    The uppermost idea with Hellenism is to see things as they really are; the uppermost ideas with Hebraism is conduct and obedience. Nothing can do away with this ineffaceable difference. The Greek quarrel with the body and its desires is, that they hinder right thinking; the Hebrew quarrel with them is, that they hinder right acting.
    Matthew Arnold (1822–1888)

    What is the foundation of that interest all men feel in Greek history, letters, art and poetry, in all its periods from the Heroic and Homeric age down to the domestic life of the Athenians and Spartans, four or five centuries later? What but this, that every man passes personally through a Grecian period.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)