What is English language?

  • (noun): An Indo-European language belonging to the West Germanic branch; the official language of Britain and the United States and most of the Commonwealth countries.
    Synonyms: English

English Language

English is a West Germanic language that was first spoken in early medieval England and is now the most widely used language in the world. It is spoken as a first language by a majority of the inhabitants of several states, including the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, Australia, Ireland, New Zealand and a number of Caribbean nations. It is the third-most-common native language in the world, after Mandarin Chinese and Spanish. It is widely learned as a second language and is an official language of the European Union, many Commonwealth countries and the United Nations, as well as in many world organisations.

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Some articles on English language:

Languages Of South Georgia And The South Sandwich Islands - Current - English Language
... English has been used throughout the recorded history of South Georgia, from the earliest explorations by Anthony de la Roché and James Cook to the present day ... The majority of the area's toponyms are either in English or anglicised, and have been given by both British and American explorers - e.g ...
SMS Language - Overall Observations and Criticisms - Negative - Effect On Verbal Language Use and Communication
... Although various other research supports the use of SMS language, the popular notion that text messaging is damaging to the linguistic development of young people persists and ... Welsh journalist and television reporter John Humphrys has criticized SMS language as "wrecking our language" ... words and statements have always been present within languages ...
English Language - Writing System
... Since around the 9th century, English has been written in the Latin script, which replaced Anglo-Saxon runes ... The modern English alphabet contains 26 letters of the Latin script a, b, c, d, e, f, g, h, i, j, k, l, m, n, o, p, q, r, s, t, u, v, w, x, y, z (which also have majuscule, capital or uppercase forms A, B, C, D ... Other symbols used in writing English include the ligatures, æ and œ (though these are no longer common) ...
Labor Party (United States) - Organizational History - Forerunners and Origins
... Party of the United States (WPUS), and the native English-speaking Philip Van Patten was elected as the party's first "Corresponding Secretary," the official in charge of the day-to-day operations of ... Paul Grottkau's Chicagoer Arbeiter-Zeitung, Joseph Brucker's Milwaukee Socialist, and an English-language weekly also published in Milwaukee called The Emancipator ... Schilling maintained an active English-speaking section ...
Student Volunteer Campus Community - History
... Education Building in 1984 to facilitate expansion of the "Cantonese Language School" SVCC Language Schools was founded in 1980 under the name "Student Volunteer Campus Community ... Originally, SVCC was an English Language School intended for new immigrants from Vietnam and the Orient learning English as a second language ... Those English as a Second Language classes were held at St ...

Famous quotes containing the words english language, language and/or english:

    Viewed freely, the English language is the accretion and growth of every dialect, race, and range of time, and is both the free and compacted composition of all.
    Walt Whitman (1819–1892)

    Talking about dreams is like talking about movies, since the cinema uses the language of dreams; years can pass in a second and you can hop from one place to another. It’s a language made of image. And in the real cinema, every object and every light means something, as in a dream.
    Frederico Fellini (1920–1993)

    The English Writers of Tragedy are possessed with a Notion, that when they represent a virtuous or innocent Person in Distress, they ought not to leave him till they have delivered him out of his Troubles, or made him triumph over his Enemies.
    Joseph Addison (1672–1719)