What is duke?

  • (noun): A British peer of the highest rank.
    See also — Additional definitions below

Duke

A duke (male) or duchess (female) can either be a monarch ruling over a duchy or a member of the nobility, historically of highest rank below the monarch. The title comes from French duc, itself from the Latin dux, 'leader', a term used in republican Rome to refer to a military commander without an official rank (particularly one of Germanic or Celtic origin), and later coming to mean the leading military commander of a province.

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Some articles on duke:

Charles XIV John Of Sweden - King of Sweden and Norway
... Charles XIV John Children Oscar I Oscar I Children Charles XV Gustaf, Duke of Upland Oscar II Princess Eugenie August, Duke of Dalarna Charles XV ...
Albert II Of Germany - Family - Ancestors
... Albert II, Duke of Austria 17 ... Albert III, Duke of Austria 18 ... Albert IV, Duke of Austria 20 ...
Marie Antoinette - Ancestry
... Nicholas II, Duke of Lorraine 8 ... Charles V, Duke of Lorraine 17 ... Leopold, Duke of Lorraine 18 ...
Zach Duke
... Zachary Thomas Duke (born April 19, 1983) is an American professional baseball pitcher for the Washington Nationals of Major League Baseball ... Duke bats and throws left-handed ...
Duke - Equivalents - Indonesia
... The word Adipati is still found in the official title of the hereditary dukes Mangkunegara of Surakarta and Paku Alam of Yogyakarta i ...

More definitions of "duke":

  • (noun): A nobleman (in various countries) of high rank.

Famous quotes containing the word duke:

    I hate the whole race.... There is no believing a word they say—your professional poets, I mean—there never existed a more worthless set than Byron and his friends for example.
    Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke Wellington (1769–1852)

    Autumn in New York, why does it seem so inviting?
    —Vernon Duke (1903–1969)

    Hume’s doctrine was that the circumstances vary, the amount of happiness does not; that the beggar cracking fleas in the sunshine under a hedge, and the duke rolling by in his chariot; the girl equipped for her first ball, and the orator returning triumphant from the debate, had different means, but the same quantity of pleasant excitement.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)