What is devise?

  • (noun): (law) a gift of real property by will.
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on devise:

Devise, Somme - Population
... Historical population of Devise, Somme Year 2006 ... Population 67. ...
Edward VI Of England - Succession Crisis - Devise For The Succession
... He composed a draft document, headed "My devise for the succession", in which he undertook to change the succession, most probably inspired by his father Henry VIII's precedent ... personally supervised the drafting of a clean version of his devise by lawyers, to which he lent his signature "in six several places." Then, on 15 June he summoned ... recalled that when he and his colleagues had raised legal objections to the devise, Northumberland had threatened them "trembling for anger, and.. ...
Merism - Legal Usage
... writing such a document will often phrase it something like this I bequeath, convey, and devise the rest, residue, and remainder of my property, whether real or personal, and wheresoever it may be ... Traditionally, a gift of real property was called a "devise" whereas a gift of other property was a "bequest" ... Nowadays, the words "bequeath" and "devise" are synonymous in most jurisdictions so that "I bequeath the rest of my property to..." is enough in both law and logic to achieve the same ...
Saint-Tropez - Devise
... Ad usque fidelis - in latin - meaning "Faithful to the end" ... After the "dark age of plundering" in the French riviera ...
Abatement Of Debts And Legacies - Definitions
... A specific devise, is a specific gift in a will to a specific person other than an amount of money ... to his brother Mike, the yacht would be a specific devise ... A general devise, is a monetary gift to a specific person to be satisfied out of the overall estate ...

More definitions of "devise":

  • (verb): Give by will, especially real property.
  • (noun): A will disposing of real property.

Famous quotes containing the word devise:

    The private buildings [of Virginia] are very rarely constructed of stone or brick; much the greatest proportion being of scantling and boards, plastered with lime. It is impossible to devise things more ugly, uncomfortable, and happily more perishable.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)

    The swimming hole is still in use. It has the same mudbank. It is still impossible to dress without carrying mud home in one’s inner garments. As an engineer I could devise improvements for that swimming hole. But I doubt if the decrease in mother’s grief at the homecoming of muddy boys would compensate the inherent joys of getting muddy.
    Herbert Hoover (1874–1964)

    In old times people used to try and square the circle; now they try and devise schemes for satisfying the Irish nation.
    Samuel Butler (1835–1902)