What is deed?

  • (noun): A legal document signed and sealed and delivered to effect a transfer of property and to show the legal right to possess it.
    Example: "He signed the deed"
    Synonyms: deed of conveyance, title
    See also — Additional definitions below

Deed

A deed is any legal instrument in writing which passes, or affirms or confirms something which passes, an interest, right, or property and that is signed, attested, delivered, and in some jurisdictions sealed. A deed, also known as an instrument in solemn form, is the most formal type of private instrument requiring not only the maker of the deed (grantor, transferor) but also attesting witnesses as signatories. A deed has therefore a greater presumption of validity and is less rebuttable than an instrument under hand, i.e., signed by the party to the deed only, or an instrument under seal. A deed can be unilateral or bilateral. Deeds include conveyances, commissions, licenses, patents, diplomas, and conditionally powers of attorney if executed as deeds. The deed is the modern descendant of the medieval charter, and delivery is thought to symbolically replace the ancient ceremony of livery of seisin.

Read more about Deed.

Some articles on deed:

List Of Judge John Deed Episodes - Series 4 (2005)
... As the case nears abandonment, Deed is forced to consider the heretofore unconstitutional option of a juryless trial ... Deed risks his career by sleeping with a claimant 17 "Defence of the Realm" G.F ... Newman Steve Kelly 5.8 million 3 February 2005 (2005-02-03) Deed's affair comes back to bite him as the Home Office pressures for his resignation or impeachment he is temporarily exiled to lecture at a ...
Merger Doctrine (property Law)
... stands for the proposition that the contract for the conveyance of property merges into the deed of conveyance therefore, any guarantees made in the contract ... some or all terms of the contract survive the closing and delivery of the deed ...
Recording - Wild Deeds
... A deed that is recorded, but is not connected to the chain of title of the property, is called a wild deed ... A wild deed does not provide constructive notice to later purchasers of the property, because subsequent bona fide purchasers can not reasonably be expected to ... searching relies on the grantor/grantee indexes, it's possible that a deed won't be discovered even though it was recorded ...
List Of Judge John Deed Episodes - Series 6 (2007)
... Newman Steve Kelly 6.2 million 9 January 2007 (2007-01-09) Deed sits in The Hague to hear the case of a British soldier who killed 11 Iraqi civilians and is being accused of war crimes ... A previous ruling Deed made against a British National Party councillor angers Muslim extremists, and a female assassin is sent to kill Deed 27 "War Crimes, Episode 2" G.F ... Steve Kelly 5.8 million 11 January 2007 (2007-01-11) During the War Crimes case in The Hague, Deed learns that the British Soldier on trial is being ...
Trust Deed (real Estate)
... In real estate in the United States, a deed of trust or trust deed is a deed wherein legal title in real property is transferred to a trustee, which holds it as security for a loan (debt) between a ... to as the trustor, while the lender is referred to as the beneficiary of the deed of trust ...

More definitions of "deed":

  • (noun): A notable achievement.
    Example: "He performed a great deed"
    Synonyms: feat, effort, exploit

Famous quotes containing the word deed:

    The host is rushing ‘twixt night and day,
    And where is there hope or deed as fair?
    Caoilte tossing his burning hair,
    And Niamh calling Away, come away.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    Those Maine woods differ essentially from ours. There you are never reminded that the wilderness which you are threading is, after all, some villager’s familiar wood-lot, some widow’s thirds, from which her ancestors have sledded fuel for generations, minutely described in some old deed which is recorded, of which the owner has got a plan, too, and old bound-marks may be found every forty rods, if you will search.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)

    One good deed dying tongueless
    Slaughters a thousand waiting upon that;
    Our praises are our wages.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)