What is dark?

More definitions of "dark":

  • (adj): (used of color) having a dark hue.
    Example: "Dark green"; "dark glasses"; "dark colors like wine red or navy blue"
  • (adj): Secret.
    Example: "Keep it dark"; "the dark mysteries of Africa and the fabled wonders of the East"
  • (noun): An unenlightened state.
    Example: "He was in the dark concerning their intentions"
    Synonyms: darkness
  • (adj): Having skin rich in melanin pigments.
    Example: "The dark races"; "dark-skinned peoples"
    Synonyms: colored, coloured, dark-skinned
  • (noun): The time after sunset and before sunrise while it is dark outside.
    Synonyms: night, nighttime
  • (adj): Not giving performances; closed.
    Example: "The theater is dark on Mondays"
  • (adj): Stemming from evil characteristics or forces; wicked or dishonorable.
    Example: "Darth Vader of the dark side"; "a dark purpose"; "dark undercurrents of ethnic hostility"
    Synonyms: black, sinister
  • (adj): Lacking enlightenment or knowledge or culture.
    Example: "The dark ages"; "a dark age in the history of education"
    Synonyms: benighted
  • (noun): Absence of light or illumination.
    Synonyms: darkness
  • (adj): Devoid or partially devoid of light or brightness; shadowed or black or somber-colored.
    Example: "Sitting in a dark corner"; "a dark day"; "dark shadows"; "the theater is dark on Mondays"; "dark as the inside of a black cat"
  • (adj): Marked by difficulty of style or expression.
    Example: "Much that was dark is now quite clear to me"
    Synonyms: obscure
  • (adj): Brunet (used of hair or skin or eyes).
    Example: "Dark eyes"

Famous quotes containing the word dark:

    I cannot say what poetry is; I know that our sufferings and our concentrated joy, our states of plunging far and dark and turning to come back to the world—so that the moment of intense turning seems still and universal—all are here, in a music like the music of our time, like the hero and like the anonymous forgotten; and there is an exchange here in which our lives are met, and created.
    Muriel Rukeyser (1913–1980)

    Why are a lady’s thighs always cool? That is, said the monk, due to three causes for which a place is always naturally cool: primo, because water runs all the way down it; secondo, because it is in a shady, dark and obscure place, where the sun never shines; and thirdly, because it is continually fanned by the winds from the breezy hole.
    François Rabelais (1494–1553)

    And the glory of character is in affronting the horrors of depravity to draw thence new nobilities of power: as Art lives and thrills in new use and combining of contrasts, and mining into the dark evermore for blacker pits of night.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)