What is culture?

  • (noun): The raising of plants or animals.
    Example: "The culture of oysters"
    See also — Additional definitions below

Culture

Culture (Latin: cultura, lit. "cultivation") is a modern concept based on a term first used in classical antiquity by the Roman orator, Cicero: "cultura animi". The term "culture" appeared first in its current sense in Europe in the 18th and 19th centuries, to connote a process of cultivation or improvement, as in agriculture or horticulture. In the 19th century, the term developed to refer first to the betterment or refinement of the individual, especially through education, and then to the fulfillment of national aspirations or ideals. In the mid-19th century, some scientists used the term "culture" to refer to a universal human capacity. For the German nonpositivist sociologist Georg Simmel, culture referred to "the cultivation of individuals through the agency of external forms which have been objectified in the course of history".

Read more about Culture.

Some articles on culture:

Vandalism - As Art
... is illegal, it is often also an integral part of modern popular culture. 23, 1871, Philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche himself meditated about the "fight against culture", wondering what could justify culture if it were to be destroyed in such a ... In this case, culture cannot be legitimised by art achievements, and Nietzsche writes "I {also} know what it means fighting against culture" ...
Yayoi Period - Features of Yayoi Culture
... Yayoi culture quickly spread to the main island of Honshū mixing with native Jōmon culture ... introduction of an irrigated, wet-rice culture from the Yangtze estuary in southern China via the Ryukyu Islands or Korean Peninsula ...
KAIST - Academics - Colleges - College of Cultural Science
... The College of Culture and Science is composed of two departments School of Humanities and Social Sciences and Graduate School of Culture and Technology ... The Graduate School of Culture and Technology also provides master and doctoral degree programs for the purpose of producing manpower of the nation’s cultural industry with support of the. 40 lecturers), the Graduate School of Culture and Technology also has 4 full-time faculties, 5 visiting professors, 7 adjunct professors, and 89 master students and 36 doctoral students ...
Cult Films Within A Particular Culture
... following within a particular region or culture if it has some unusual significance to that region or culture ... of The Wizard of Oz (1939) in American and British gay culture, although a widely viewed and historically important film in greater American culture ... Singin' in the Rain is another film adopted by American gay culture which used to regularly be shown during the 1980s and early 1990s for extended runs ...
Ancient Egypt - History - Ptolemaic Dynasty
... of Greek rule, and became a seat of learning and culture, centered at the famous Library of Alexandria ... Greek culture did not supplant native Egyptian culture, as the Ptolemies supported time-honored traditions in an effort to secure the loyalty of the populace ...

More definitions of "culture":

  • (noun): The attitudes and behavior that are characteristic of a particular social group or organization.
    Example: "The developing drug culture"; "the reason that the agency is doomed to inaction has something to do with the FBI culture"
  • (noun): (bacteriology) the product of cultivating micro-organisms in a nutrient medium.
  • (noun): The tastes in art and manners that are favored by a social group.
  • (noun): (biology) the growing of microorganisms in a nutrient medium (such as gelatin or agar).
    Example: "The culture of cells in a Petri dish"
  • (noun): All the knowledge and values shared by a society.
    Synonyms: acculturation

Famous quotes containing the word culture:

    The highest end of government is the culture of men.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    ... we’ve allowed a youth-centered culture to leave us so estranged from our future selves that, when asked about the years beyond fifty, sixty, or seventy—all part of the average human life span providing we can escape hunger, violence, and other epidemics—many people can see only a blank screen, or one on which they project fear of disease and democracy.
    Gloria Steinem (b. 1934)

    The purpose of education is to keep a culture from being drowned in senseless repetitions, each of which claims to offer a new insight.
    Harold Rosenberg (1906–1978)