What is cost?

  • (verb): Require to lose, suffer, or sacrifice.
    Example: "This mistake cost him his job"
    See also — Additional definitions below

Cost

In production, research, retail, and accounting, a cost is the value of money that has been used up to produce something, and hence is not available for use anymore. In business, the cost may be one of acquisition, in which case the amount of money expended to acquire it is counted as cost. In this case, money is the input that is gone in order to acquire the thing. This acquisition cost may be the sum of the cost of production as incurred by the original producer, and further costs of transaction as incurred by the acquirer over and above the price paid to the producer. Usually, the price also includes a mark-up for profit over the cost of production.

Read more about Cost.

Some articles on cost:

Tax Depreciation
... Most income tax systems allow a tax deduction for recovery of the cost of assets used in a business or for the production of income ... Where the assets are consumed currently, the cost may be deducted currently as an expense or treated as part of cost of goods sold ... The cost of assets not currently consumed generally must be deferred and recovered over time, such as through depreciation ...
Barber - Training
... Cost of Barber School—Many states require a barber license in order to practice barbering professionally ... The cost of barber school varies from state to state, and also from metro area to metro area ... Schools in larger metropolitan areas tend to cost more than those located in more rural towns ...
Experience Curve Effects - The Experience Curve
... cumulative volume doubles, value added costs (including administration, marketing, distribution, and manufacturing) fall by a constant percentage ... with the of cumulative units produced on the horizontal axis and unit cost on the vertical axis ... A curve showing a 15% cost reduction for every doubling of output is called an “85% experience curve”, indicating that unit costs drop to 85% of their original level ...
Vision Radio Network - History
... country towns in Australia have benefited from the cost-effective approach of using low powered FM transmitters ... The setup cost is achievable for most communities ... The ongoing cost is minimal due to low maintenance equipment with low power consumption - some stations in remote areas even use solar power ...
Zenvo - Cost
... It is estimated that the basic cost of the car, without registration or tax, will be around five million Danish kroner, which is approximately $850,000 US dollars ... The cost of putting the car on the road in Denmark would be around 16 million kroner as a result of registration expenses, but Zenvo is aiming at the export market alone ...

More definitions of "cost":

  • (noun): Value measured by what must be given or done or undergone to obtain something.
    Example: "The cost in human life was enormous"
    Synonyms: price, toll
  • (noun): The total spent for goods or services including money and time and labor.
  • (noun): The property of having material worth (often indicated by the amount of money something would bring if sold).
    Example: "He couldn't calculate the cost of the collection"
    Synonyms: monetary value, price
  • (verb): Be priced at.
    Example: "These shoes cost $100"
    Synonyms: be

Famous quotes containing the word cost:

    The one regret I have about my own abortions is that they cost money that might otherwise have been spent on something more pleasurable, like taking the kids to movies and theme parks.
    Barbara Ehrenreich (b. 1941)

    Apparently, a democracy is a place where numerous elections are held at great cost without issues and with interchangeable candidates.
    Gore Vidal (b. 1925)

    To call a posit a posit is not to patronize it. A posit can be unavoidable except at the cost of other no less artificial expedients. Everything to which we concede existence is a posit from the standpoint of a description of the theory-building process, and simultaneously real from the standpoint of the theory that is being built.
    Willard Van Orman Quine (b. 1908)