What is Continent?

  • (adj): Having control over urination and defecation.
    See also — Additional definitions below

Continent

A continent is one of several very large landmasses on Earth. They are generally identified by convention rather than any strict criteria, with seven regions commonly regarded as continents—they are (from largest in size to smallest): Asia, Africa, North America, South America, Antarctica, Europe, and Australia.

Read more about Continent.

Some articles on Continent:

Continent-ocean Boundary
... The Continent-ocean boundary (COB) or continent-ocean transition is the boundary between continental crust and oceanic crust on a passive margin ... The identification of continent-ocean boundaries is important in the definition of plate boundaries at the time of break-up when trying to reconstruct the geometry and position of ancient continents e.g ...
Continent - Geology
... crust, Plate tectonics Geologists use the term continent in a different manner from geographers, where a continent is defined by continental crust a platform of metamorphic and ... Some geologists restrict the term 'continent' to portions of the crust built around stable Precambrian "shield", typically 1.5 to 3.8 billion years old, called a craton ... The margins of geologic continents are characterized by currently active or relatively recently active mobile belts and deep troughs of accumulated marine or deltaic sediments ...
List Of Historical Countries And Empires Spanning More Than One Continent
... of nations covering land on two or more continents, including islands associated with a continent other than the one where the nation was based ... of transcontinental occurrence with the number of continents covered in parentheses and the nation's primary continent listed first ...
Shanhai Yudi Quantu - Description - Magallania
... This transliterates the name "Magallanica", a name given to the prospective continent at the time in honor of Ferdinand Magellan, who had crossed past Tierra del Fuego ... The map notes how little is known about this continent – "Few have reached these southern regions ...
Maritime Continent
... Maritime Continent is the name given primarily by meteorologists to the region of Southeast Asia which comprises many islands, peninsulas and shallow seas ... The name combines the terms maritime and continent normally used as opposites in the description of climate ...

More definitions of "Continent":

  • (noun): One of the large landmasses of the earth.
    Example: "There are seven continents"; "pioneers had to cross the continent on foot"
  • (adj): Abstaining from sexual intercourse.
    Synonyms: celibate
  • (noun): The European mainland.
    Example: "Englishmen like to visit the Continent but they wouldn't like to live there"

Famous quotes containing the word continent:

    The second day of July 1776, will be the most memorable epoch in the history of America. I am apt to believe that it will be celebrated by succeeding generations as the great anniversary festival. It ought to be commemorated, as the day of deliverance, by solemn acts of devotion to God Almighty. It ought to be solemnized with pomp and parade, with shows, games, sports, guns, bells, bonfires and illuminations, from one end of this continent to the other, from this time forward forever more
    John Adams (1735–1826)

    The land is the appointed remedy for whatever is false and fantastic in our culture. The continent we inhabit is to be physic and food for our mind, as well as our body. The land, with its tranquilizing, sanative influences, is to repair the errors of a scholastic and traditional education, and bring us to just relations with men and things.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    The open frontier, the hardships of homesteading from scratch, the wealth of natural resources, the whole vast challenge of a continent waiting to be exploited, combined to produce a prevailing materialism and an American drive bent as much, if not more, on money, property, and power than was true of the Old World from which we had fled.
    Barbara Tuchman (1912–1989)