What is contact?

  • (noun): A person who is in a position to give you special assistance.
    Synonyms: middleman
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on contact:

Karateka - Practice - Kumite
... Levels of physical contact during sparring vary considerably ... Full contact karate has several variants ... competition under the World Karate Federation is free or structured with light contact or semi contact and points are awarded by a referee ...
Rolodex
... A Rolodex is a rotating file device used to store business contact information (the name is a portmanteau word of rolling and index) currently manufactured by Newell Rubbermaid ... shaped index cards the user writes the contact information for one person or company on each card ... Many users avoid the effort of writing by taping the contact's business card directly to the Rolodex index card ...
First Contact (anthropology)
... First contact is a term describing the first meeting of two cultures previously unaware of one another ... One notable example of first contact is that between the Spanish and the Arawak (and ultimately all of the Americas) in 1492 ... Such contact is sometimes described later by one or both groups as a "discovery", particularly by the more technologically developed society ...
Negiah - Biblical Prohibition and Subsequent Exegesis
... The prohibition against physical contact with arayot is codified by Rishonim including Maimonides (Hilchos Issurei Biah 211) and the Moses ben Jacob of Coucy (Sefer Mitzvos Gadol 126), who note the consideration of ... the Shulchan Aruch formulate this prohibition as "hugging, kissing, or enjoying close physical contact" ("chibek venashak veneheneh bekiruv basar") ...
Negiah
... is the concept in Halakha that forbids or restricts physical contact with a member of the opposite sex (except for one's spouse, children, siblings, grandchildren, parents, and grandparents) ... Orthodox Jews follow the laws with strict modesty and take measures to avoid accidental contact, such as avoiding sitting next to a member of the opposite sex on a bus ... Others are more lenient, only avoiding purposeful contact ...

More definitions of "contact":

  • (noun): The physical coming together of two or more things.
    Example: "Contact with the pier scraped paint from the hull"
    Synonyms: impinging, striking
  • (noun): Close interaction.
    Example: "They kept in daily contact"; "they claimed that they had been in contact with extraterrestrial beings"
  • (noun): The state or condition of touching or of being in immediate proximity.
    Example: "Litmus paper turns red on contact with an acid"
  • (noun): (electronics) a junction where things (as two electrical conductors) touch or are in physical contact.
    Synonyms: tangency
  • (noun): A communicative interaction.
    Example: "The pilot made contact with the base"
    Synonyms: touch
  • (verb): Be in direct physical contact with; make contact.
    Example: "The wire must not contact the metal cover"; "The surfaces contact at this point"
    Synonyms: touch, adjoin, meet
  • (noun): A thin curved glass or plastic lens designed to fit over the cornea in order to correct vision or to deliver medication.
    Synonyms: contact lens
  • (noun): The act of touching physically.
    Example: "Her fingers came in contact with the light switch"

Famous quotes containing the word contact:

    It is only when men lose their contact with this eternal life-flame, and become merely personal, things in themselves, instead of things kindled in the flame, that the fight between man and woman begins.
    —D.H. (David Herbert)

    Who among us has not, in moments of ambition, dreamt of the miracle of a form of poetic prose, musical but without rhythm and rhyme, both supple and staccato enough to adapt itself to the lyrical movements of our souls, the undulating movements of our reveries, and the convulsive movements of our consciences? This obsessive ideal springs above all from frequent contact with enormous cities, from the junction of their innumerable connections.
    Charles Baudelaire (1821–1867)

    To write weekly, to write daily, to write shortly, to write for busy people catching trains in the morning or for tired people coming home in the evening, is a heartbreaking task for men who know good writing from bad. They do it, but instinctively draw out of harm’s way anything precious that might be damaged by contact with the public, or anything sharp that might irritate its skin.
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)