What is bring?

  • (verb): Be sold for a certain price.
    Synonyms: fetch, bring in
    See also — Additional definitions below

More definitions of "bring":

  • (verb): Take something or somebody with oneself somewhere.
    Example: "Bring me the box from the other room"
    Synonyms: convey, take
  • (verb): Attract the attention of.
    Example: "The noise and the screaming brought the curious"
  • (verb): Induce or persuade.
    Example: "The confession of one of the accused brought the others to admit to the crime as well"
  • (verb): Bring into a different state.
    Synonyms: land
  • (verb): Go or come after and bring or take back.
    Example: "Could you bring the wine?"
    Synonyms: get, convey, fetch
  • (verb): Avance or set forth in court.
    Example: "Bring charges", "institute proceedings"
    Synonyms: institute
  • (verb): Cause to happen or to occur as a consequence.
    Example: "Bring comments"
    Synonyms: work, play, wreak, make for
  • (verb): Cause to come into a particular state or condition.
    Example: "Long hard years of on the job training had brought them to their competence"; "bring water to the boiling point"
  • (verb): Be accompanied by.
    Example: "Can I bring my cousin to the dinner?"

Famous quotes containing the word bring:

    Pull down the blinds, bring fiddle and clarionet
    That there be no foot silent in the room
    Nor mouth from kissing, nor from wine unwet;
    Our Father Rosicross is in his tomb.
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    My belief is that science is to wreck us, and that we are like monkeys monkeying with a loaded shell; we don’t in the least know or care where our practically infinite energies come from or will bring us to.
    Henry Brooks Adams (1838–1918)

    The future of America may or may not bring forth a black President, a woman President, a Jewish President, but it most certainly always will have a suburban President. A President whose senses have been defined by the suburbs, where lakes and public baths mutate into back yards and freeways, where walking means driving, where talking means telephoning, where watching means TV, and where living means real, imitation life.
    Arthur Kroker (b. 1945)