What is benjamin?

  • (noun): (Old Testament) the youngest and best-loved son of Jacob and Rachel and one of the twelve forebears of the tribes of Israel.
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Benjamin

Benjamin (Hebrew: בִּנְיָמִין, Binyamin Binyāmîn) was the last-born of Jacob's twelve sons, and the second and last son of Rachel in Jewish, Christian and Islamic tradition. He was the founder of the Israelite Tribe of Benjamin. In the Biblical account, unlike Rachel's first son, Joseph, Benjamin was born in Canaan. In the Qur'an, Benjamin is referred to as righteous young child, who remained with Jacob when the older brothers plotted against Joseph.

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Some articles on benjamin:

William W. Rice - Rice Family and Relations
... English immigrant to Massachusetts Bay Colony, as follows William Whitney Rice, son of Benjamin Rice (1784–1847), son of Caleb Rice (1755–1809 ...
Killua Castle - History
... and its surrounding lands were granted around 1667 to Benjamin Chapman, a captain in Cromwell's army, having been confiscated from the Knights Hospitallers of St ... death the estate passed to his elder son, William, and on William's death in 1734 to his son Benjamin ... Benjamin died in 1779 and was succeeded by his son Benjamin, who was created a baronet ...
J. J. Benjamin
... Benjamin (b ... His pen name was "Benjamin II", in allusion to Benjamin of Tudela ...
Benjamin, Duke Of Soubise
... Benjamin de Rohan, duc de Soubise (1580?–1642), was a French Huguenot leader ... The princes de Soubise did not descend from Benjamin, who never bore that title ...
Benjamin Jennings Caddy
... Benjamin (Ben) Jennings Caddy (November 1881 - 13 March 1955) was a militant trade unionist who is regarded as the doyen of the trade union movement in South Africa ... Persondata Name Caddy, Benjamin Alternative names Short description Date of birth 1881 Place of birth Date of death 13 March 1955 Place of ...

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Famous quotes containing the word benjamin:

    Not to find one’s way in a city may well be uninteresting and banal. It requires ignorance—nothing more. But to lose oneself in a city—as one loses oneself in a forest—that calls for a quite different schooling. Then, signboard and street names, passers-by, roofs, kiosks, or bars must speak to the wanderer like a cracking twig under his feet in the forest.
    —Walter Benjamin (1892–1940)

    Quotations in my work are like wayside robbers who leap out armed and relieve the stroller of his conviction.
    —Walter Benjamin (1892–1940)