What is April?

  • (noun): The month following March and preceding May.
    Synonyms: Apr

April

April is the fourth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars, and one of four months with a length of 30 days.

Read more about April.

Some articles on April:

1850 - Deaths - April–June
... April 7 – William Lisle Bowles, English poet and critic (b. 1762) April 9 – William Prout, English chemist and physician (b. 1785) April 12 – Adoniram Judson, U.S ...
1810 - Events - April–June
... April through Summer – Kingdom of Hawaii unified ... April 27 – Beethoven composes his famous piano piece, Für Elise ...
Reform Of The Date Of Easter
... for Easter 1982–2022 Year Western Eastern 1982 April 11 April 1983 ... April 3 May 1984 ... April 1985 ... April 7 April 1986 ... March 30 May 1987 ... April 1988 ... April 3 April ...
April Symbols
... April's birthstone is the diamond, which symbolizes innocence ... Zodiac signs for the month of April are Aries (astrology) (until April 19) and Taurus (astrology) (April 21 onwards) ...
2004 In American Television - Ending This Year
27 Lloyd in Space 2001 March 13 Hack 2002 March 25 The Chris Isaak Show 2001 April 4 Home Movies 1999 April 6 It's All Relative 2003 April 9 Life with Bonnie 2002 April ...

Famous quotes containing the word april:

    Summer of man its sunlight and its flower,
    Spring-time of man all April in a face.
    John Masefield (1878–1967)

    Spring’s an expansive time: yet I don’t trust
    March with its peck of dust,
    Nor April with its rainbow-crowned brief showers,
    Nor even May, whose flowers
    One frost may wither thro’ the sunless hours.
    Christina Georgina Rossetti (1830–1894)

    Postmodernism is, almost by definition, a transitional cusp of social, cultural, economic and ideological history when modernism’s high-minded principles and preoccupations have ceased to function, but before they have been replaced with a totally new system of values. It represents a moment of suspension before the batteries are recharged for the new millennium, an acknowledgment that preceding the future is a strange and hybrid interregnum that might be called the last gasp of the past.
    Gilbert Adair, British author, critic. Sunday Times: Books (London, April 21, 1991)