What is action?

  • (noun): A process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings).
    Example: "The action of natural forces"
    Synonyms: natural process, natural action, activity
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on action, actions:

Klein–Gordon Equation - Action
... can also be derived from the following action where is the Klein–Gordon field and is its mass ...
Action Theory (philosophy) - Overview
... Basic action theory typically describes action as behavior caused by an agent in a particular situation ... In the simple theory (see Donald Davidson), the desire and belief jointly cause the action ... of satisfying that desire are always what is behind an action ...
Filmation - Live-action Shows
... Filmation incorporated live-action into some of its animated series ... Shows like The Hardy Boys and Archie's Funhouse featured live-action footage of an audience watching the bands perform and Fat Albert had segments featuring series creator Bill Cosby ... The Kid Superpower Hour with Shazam!, was more of a hybrid - a live-action variety show with animated segments ...
Action Theory (philosophy) - Discussion
... For example, throwing a ball is an instance of action it involves an intention, a goal, and a bodily movement guided by the agent ... hand, catching a cold is not considered an action because it is something which happens to a person, not something done by one ... Other events are less clearly defined as actions or not ...
Karabiner 98k - Civil Use - Modern Civilian Offspring
... The Mauser-type action is widely held to be the pinnacle of bolt-action rifle design, and the vast majority of modern weapons of this type, both ... commissioned Mauser to develop the M 98 magnum action over a hundred years ago ... system remains the standard by which other action designs are judged ...

More definitions of "action":

  • (noun): The state of being active.
    Example: "He is out of action"
    Synonyms: activity, activeness
  • (verb): Institute legal proceedings against; file a suit against.
    Synonyms: sue, litigate, process
  • (noun): A judicial proceeding brought by one party against another; one party prosecutes another for a wrong done or for protection of a right or for prevention of a wrong.
    Synonyms: legal action, action at law
  • (noun): The series of events that form a plot.
    Example: "His novels always have a lot of action"
  • (noun): The most important or interesting work or activity in a specific area or field.
    Example: "The action is no longer in technology stocks but in municipal bonds"; "gawkers always try to get as close to the action as possible"
  • (noun): A military engagement.
    Example: "He saw action in Korea"
    Synonyms: military action
  • (noun): Something done (usually as opposed to something said).
    Example: "There were stories of murders and other unnatural actions"
  • (noun): An act by a government body or supranational organization.
    Example: "Recent federal action undermined the segregationist position"; "the United Nations must have the power to propose and organize action without being hobbled by irrelevant issues"; "the Union action of emancipating Southern slaves"
  • (noun): The operating part that transmits power to a mechanism.
    Example: "The piano had a very stiff action"
    Synonyms: action mechanism
  • (noun): The trait of being active and energetic and forceful.
    Example: "A man of action"

Famous quotes containing the word action:

    The philosophy of action for action, power for the sake of power, had become an established orthodoxy. “Thou has conquered, O go-getting Babbitt.”
    Aldous Huxley (1894–1963)

    U.S. international and security policy ... has as its primary goal the preservation of what we might call “the Fifth Freedom,” understood crudely but with a fair degree of accuracy as the freedom to rob, to exploit and to dominate, to undertake any course of action to ensure that existing privilege is protected and advanced.
    Noam Chomsky (b. 1928)

    ...a fixed aim furnishes us with a fixed measure, by which we can decide whether such or such an action proposed is worth trying for or not, and as aims must vary with the individual, the decisions of any two people as to the desirableness of an action may not be the same.
    Anna C. Brackett (1836–1911)