What is action?

  • (noun): The trait of being active and energetic and forceful.
    Example: "A man of action"
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on action, actions:

Action Theory (philosophy) - Overview
... Basic action theory typically describes action as behavior caused by an agent in a particular situation ... theory (see Donald Davidson), the desire and belief jointly cause the action ... that desire are always what is behind an action ...
Karabiner 98k - Civil Use - Modern Civilian Offspring
... The Mauser-type action is widely held to be the pinnacle of bolt-action rifle design, and the vast majority of modern weapons of this type, both military and civilian, are still based on ... commissioned Mauser to develop the M 98 magnum action over a hundred years ago ... remains the standard by which other action designs are judged ...
Filmation - Live-action Shows
... Filmation incorporated live-action into some of its animated series ... like The Hardy Boys and Archie's Funhouse featured live-action footage of an audience watching the bands perform and Fat Albert had segments featuring series creator Bill Cosby ... The Kid Superpower Hour with Shazam!, was more of a hybrid - a live-action variety show with animated segments ...
Action Theory (philosophy) - Discussion
... For example, throwing a ball is an instance of action it involves an intention, a goal, and a bodily movement guided by the agent ... On the other hand, catching a cold is not considered an action because it is something which happens to a person, not something done by one ... Other events are less clearly defined as actions or not ...
Klein–Gordon Equation - Action
... equation can also be derived from the following action where is the Klein–Gordon field and is its mass ...

More definitions of "action":

  • (noun): A process existing in or produced by nature (rather than by the intent of human beings).
    Example: "The action of natural forces"
    Synonyms: natural process, natural action, activity
  • (verb): Institute legal proceedings against; file a suit against.
    Synonyms: sue, litigate, process
  • (noun): The series of events that form a plot.
    Example: "His novels always have a lot of action"
  • (noun): The most important or interesting work or activity in a specific area or field.
    Example: "The action is no longer in technology stocks but in municipal bonds"; "gawkers always try to get as close to the action as possible"
  • (noun): The operating part that transmits power to a mechanism.
    Example: "The piano had a very stiff action"
    Synonyms: action mechanism
  • (noun): Something done (usually as opposed to something said).
    Example: "There were stories of murders and other unnatural actions"
  • (noun): A judicial proceeding brought by one party against another; one party prosecutes another for a wrong done or for protection of a right or for prevention of a wrong.
    Synonyms: legal action, action at law
  • (noun): A military engagement.
    Example: "He saw action in Korea"
    Synonyms: military action
  • (noun): An act by a government body or supranational organization.
    Example: "Recent federal action undermined the segregationist position"; "the United Nations must have the power to propose and organize action without being hobbled by irrelevant issues"; "the Union action of emancipating Southern slaves"
  • (noun): The state of being active.
    Example: "He is out of action"
    Synonyms: activity, activeness

Famous quotes containing the word action:

    Without our being especially conscious of the transition, the word “parent” has gradually come to be used as much as a verb as a noun. Whereas we formerly thought mainly about “being a parent,” we now find ourselves talking about learning how “to parent.” . . . It suggests that we may now be concentrating on action rather than status, on what we do rather than what or who we are.
    Bettye M. Caldwell (20th century)

    Temperamentally, the writer exists on happenings, on contacts, conflicts, action and reaction, speed, pressure, tension. Were he a contemplative purely, he would not write.
    Elizabeth Bowen (1899–1973)