What is act?

  • (noun): A short theatrical performance that is part of a longer program.
    Example: "He did his act three times every evening"
    Synonyms: routine, number, turn, bit
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on act:

Qui Tam - False Claims Act
... The False Claims Act (31 U.S.C ... The act of filing such actions is informally called "whistleblowing." Persons filing under the Act stand to receive a portion (usually about 15-25 percent ... The Act provides a legal tool to counteract fraudulent billings turned in to the Federal Government ...
Racketeer Influenced And Corrupt Organizations Act
... The Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act, commonly referred to as the RICO Act or simply RICO, is a United States federal law that provides for extended ... The RICO Act focuses specifically on racketeering, and it allows for the leaders of a syndicate to be tried for the crimes which they ordered others to do or assisted them. 901(a) of the Organized Crime Control Act of 1970 (Pub.L ...
Qui Tam
... fell into disuse in England and Wales following the Common Informers Act 1951 but, as of 2010, remains current in the United States under the False Claims Act, 31 U.S.C ... in September of that year, the enactment of the Leahy-Smith America Invents Act effectively removed qui tam remedies from ยง 292 ...
Fiorello La Guardia - Early Political Career - Return To Congress
... His major legislation was the Norris-LaGuardia Act, cosponsored with Nebraska senator George Norris in 1932 ... those limitations were imposed between the enactment of the Clayton Antitrust Act in 1914 and the end of the 1920s ... and that Congress therefore has wide power in defining and restricting their jurisdiction, the act forbids issuance of injunctions to sustain anti-union contracts of employment, to ...
European Communities Act 1972 (UK)
... The European Communities Act 1972 (c. 68) is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom providing for the incorporation of European Community law into the domestic law of the United Kingdom ... It is not to be confused with the Irish law of the same name, Act No ...

More definitions of "act":

  • (noun): A manifestation of insincerity.
    Example: "He put on quite an act for her benefit"
  • (verb): Be engaged in an activity, often for no particular purpose other than pleasure.
  • (verb): Behave in a certain manner; show a certain behavior; conduct or comport oneself.
    Example: "You should act like an adult"
    Synonyms: behave, do
  • (verb): Perform an action, or work out or perform (an action).
    Example: "Think before you act"; "The governor should act on the new energy bill"
    Synonyms: move
  • (verb): Have an effect or outcome; often the one desired or expected.
    Example: "The breaks of my new car act quickly"
    Synonyms: work
  • (noun): A subdivision of a play or opera or ballet.
  • (verb): Pretend to have certain qualities or state of mind.
    Synonyms: play, act as
  • (verb): Discharge one's duties.
    Example: "She acts as the chair"; "In what capacity are you acting?"
  • (verb): Play a role or part.
    Example: "She wants to act Lady Macbeth, but she is too young for the role"
    Synonyms: play, represent
  • (verb): Be suitable for theatrical performance.
    Example: "This scene acts well"
  • (noun): A legal document codifying the result of deliberations of a committee or society or legislative body.
    Synonyms: enactment

Famous quotes containing the word act:

    Communication is a continual balancing act, juggling the conflicting needs for intimacy and independence. To survive in the world, we have to act in concert with others, but to survive as ourselves, rather than simply as cogs in a wheel, we have to act alone.
    Deborah Tannen (20th century)

    When a uniform exercise of kindness to prisoners on our part has been returned by as uniform severity on the part of our enemies, you must excuse me for saying it is high time, by other lessons, to teach respect to the dictates of humanity; in such a case, retaliation becomes an act of benevolence.
    Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826)

    Presidents quickly realize that while a single act might destroy the world they live in, no one single decision can make life suddenly better or can turn history around for the good.
    Lyndon Baines Johnson (1908–1973)