What are colors?

  • (noun): A flag that shows its nationality.
    Synonyms: colours
    See also — Additional definitions below

Some articles on colors, color:

Pleasant Valley High School (Pennsylvania) - Dress Code
... dress code which limits the type, style and colors of clothing and jewelry students may wear ... The main colors are shades of blue, white, gray, and black ... Colors may not be worn mono-chromatically ...
Siamese Fighting Fish - Colors
... nicknamed "The Jewel of the Orient" due to their beauty and wide range of colors which are produced through selective breeding ... Wild fish exhibit strong colors only when agitated ... Colors available to the aquarist include red, blue, black, turquoise, orange, yellow, green, bright blue with pink highlights, cream and even true white (the "Opaque" white, not to be confused with ...
Complementary Colors - Color Theory
... In color theory, two colors are called complementary if, when mixed in the proper proportion, they produce a neutral color (grey, white, or black) ... In roughly-perceptual color models, the neutral colors (white, greys, and black) lie along a central axis ... For example, in the HSV color space, complementary colors (as defined in HSV) lie opposite each other on any horizontal cross-section ...

More definitions of "colors":

  • (noun): A distinguishing emblem.
    Example: "His tie proclaimed his school colors"
    Synonyms: colours

Famous quotes containing the word colors:

    Adultery is the vice of equivocation.
    It is not marriage but a mockery of it, a merging that mixes love and dread together like jackstraws. There is no understanding of contentment in adultery.... You belong to each other in what together you’ve made of a third identity that almost immediately cancels your own. There is a law in art that proves it. Two colors are proven complimentary only when forming that most desolate of all colors—neutral gray.
    Alexander Theroux (b. 1940)

    Nature always wears the colors of the spirit. To a man laboring under calamity, the heat of his own fire hath sadness in it.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    One wonders that the tithing-men and fathers of the town are not out to see what the trees mean by their high colors and exuberance of spirits, fearing that some mischief is brewing. I do not see what the Puritans did at this season, when the maples blaze out in scarlet. They certainly could not have worshiped in groves then. Perhaps that is what they built meeting-houses and fenced them round with horse-sheds for.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)