West Hurley

Some articles on west hurley, hurley, west:

List Of Ulster And Delaware Railroad Stations - Main Line Stations
... West Hurley West Hurley 1954 ... Original wood station demolished after construction of the Ashokan Reservoir ... Located on West Hurley Dike of the Ashokan Reservoir ... West Davenport West Davenport none present 1923 ... Junction with Cooperstown and Charlotte Valley Railroad ...
New York State Route 375 - History
... The north–south highway linking West Hurley to Woodstock was originally designated as part of Route 5, an unsigned legislative route, by the New York State Legislature in 1908 ... Route 5 continued east of West Hurley on modern NY 28 and west of Woodstock on what is now NY 212 ... The section of Route 5 between West Hurley and Woodstock was designated as the signed NY 375 as part of the 1930 renumbering of state highways in New York ...
West Hurley Railroad Station
... The West Hurley Station, MP 9.8, later MP 10.2, was a railroad station on the Ulster and Delaware Railroad that was made in the late nineteenth century and rebuilt during the construction ... was constructed to replace it which was located at the West Hurley Dike of the Ashokan Reservoir ... A water tower was located north west of the station serving water plugs located between the tracks ...
West Hurley, New York - Demographics
... There were 866 households out of which 29.0% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 56.7% were married couples living together, 9.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.7% were non-families. 25.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older ...

Famous quotes containing the word west:

    The West is preparing to add its fables to those of the East. The valleys of the Ganges, the Nile, and the Rhine having yielded their crop, it remains to be seen what the valleys of the Amazon, the Plate, the Orinoco, the St. Lawrence, and the Mississippi will produce. Perchance, when, in the course of ages, American liberty has become a fiction of the past,—as it is to some extent a fiction of the present,—the poets of the world will be inspired by American mythology.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)