Wells

Wells is a cathedral city and civil parish in the Mendip district of Somerset, England, on the southern edge of the Mendip Hills. Although the population recorded in the 2001 census is 10,406, it has had city status since 1205. It is the second smallest English city in terms of area and population after the City of London although, unlike the latter, Wells is not part of a larger metropolitan conurbation, and is consequently described in some sources as being England's smallest city.

The name Wells derives from the three wells dedicated to Saint Andrew, one in the market place and two within the grounds of the Bishop's Palace and cathedral. There was a small Roman settlement around the wells, but its importance grew under the Saxons when King Ine of Wessex founded a minster church in 704, around which the settlement grew. Wells became a trading centre and involved in cloth making before its involvement in both the English Civil War and the Monmouth Rebellion during the 17th century. In the 19th century, transport infrastructure improved with stations on three different railway lines.

The cathedral and the associated religious and architectural history have made Wells a tourist destination, which provides much of the employment. The city has a variety of sporting and cultural activities and houses several schools including The Blue School, a state coeducational comprehensive school originally founded in 1641 (and became commonly known as the Blue School by 1654) and the independent Wells Cathedral School, which was founded in 909 and is one of the five established musical schools for school-age children in Britain. The historic architecture of the city has also been used as a location for several films and television programmes.

Read more about Wells:  History, Governance, Geography, Demography, Economy, Transport, Education, Culture, Religious Sites, Sport, In Popular Culture, Notable People

Other articles related to "wells, well":

Llangammarch Wells
... Llangammarch Wells or simply Llangammarch (Welsh Llangamarch) is a village in the parish of Llangammarch in Powys, within the historic boundaries of Brecknockshire, mid Wales, lying on the ... the four spa villages of mid-Wales, alongside Llandrindod Wells, Builth Wells and Llanwrtyd Wells ... The spa was focused on a barium well, which is now closed, but the village is still popular with anglers ...
Wells, Wisconsin - Demographics
... There were 180 households out of which 40.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 68.9% were married couples living together, 7.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 17.2% were non-families. 13.3% of all households were made up of individuals and 3.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older ...
Wells And Walsingham Light Railway - Overview
... It runs from the coastal town of Wells-next-the-Sea to the pilgrimage centre at Walsingham ... It is the northern section of the former Wymondham, Dereham, Fakenham and Wells-next-the-Sea line which was closed to passengers in stages from 1964 to 1969 as part of the Beeching cuts ... the A149 approximately half a mile south of the original terminus at Wells ...
Wells–Bennett–Grant Family - Members - Robert Foster Bennett
... Grant Great-grandson of Jedediah Morgan Grant Great-grandson of Daniel Hanmer Wells Great-nephew of Heber Manning Wells Half-great-nephew of Elizabeth Ann Wells (C ...
Aldbourne - Bell Foundry
... active 1744–46), Edward Read (active 1751–57), Edne Witts (active 1759–74), Robert I Wells (active 1760–81), Robert II Wells (active 1781–93 ... Bells cast by the Wells family survive at parish churches including SS ...

Famous quotes containing the word wells:

    All through the nineties I met people. Crowds of people. Met and met and met, until it seemed that people were born and hastily grew up, just to be met.
    —Carolyn Wells (1862–1942)

    ‘But where can we draw water,’
    Said Pearse to Connolly,
    ‘When all the wells are parched away?
    O plain as plain can be
    There’s nothing but our own red blood
    Can make a right Rose Tree.’
    William Butler Yeats (1865–1939)

    To take pride in a library kills it. Then, its motive power shifts over to the critical if admiring visitor, and apologies are necessary and acceptable and the fat is in the fire.
    —Carolyn Wells (1862–1942)