Wee Willie Winkie

Wee Willie Winkie

"Wee Willie Winkie" is a Scottish nursery rhyme, whose titular figure has become popular the world over as a personification of sleep. The poem, written by William Miller and titled "Willie Winkie", was first published in Whistle-binkie: Stories for the Fireside in 1841. It has a Roud Folk Song Index number of 13711.

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Famous quotes related to wee willie winkie:

    Wee Willie Winkie rins through the town,
    Up stairs and doon stairs in his nicht-gown,
    Tirling at the window, crying at the lock,
    ‘Are the weans in their bed, for it’s now ten o’clock?’
    William Miller (1810–1872)