Wear Black

Some articles on black, wear, wear black:

Academic Dress Of Universities In Queensland, Australia - University of The Sunshine Coast - Robes
... Black Bachelor gowns are worn by all below the rank of Master ... Senior Fellows of the University however also wear these gowns ... Masters style Gowns in black are worn by Master degree holders, the Yeoman Bedell and members of the University Council ...
Ceremonial Clothing In Western Cultures - Death
... Anyone attending the funeral is expected to wear black or at least sombre or drab-colored clothing ... A widow may wear a black veil over her face ... Until the late 19th and early 20th centuries, relatives were expected to wear mourning for periods that varied depending on the closeness of their relation to the deceased ...
Judicial Clothing - Commonwealth Countries - Canada
... Judges of the Supreme Court of Canada wear red robes with white fur trim on ceremonial occasions together with tricorne hats however, they wear black gowns when hearing ... Judges of all other federal and provincial courts wear black gowns, sometimes adorned with various sashes and crests which depend on the level of court and the province in which the case is heard ... All Canadian judges also wear black court waistcoats with white collar and tabs ...
Peel Regional Police - Uniform
... As of January 2010, front line officers wear black shirts, cargo pants with a red stripe and boots ... Winter jackets are either black or reflective orange/yellow with the word POLICE in white and blue at the back ... Senior officers wear white shirts and a black dress jacket ...

Famous quotes containing the words black and/or wear:

    To be black and an intellectual in America is to live in a box.... On the box is a label, not of my own choosing.
    Stephen Carter (b. 1954)

    We long for our father. We wear his clothes, and actually try to fill his shoes. . . . We hang on to him, begging him to teach us how to do whatever is masculine, to throw balls or be in the woods or go see where he works. . . . We want our fathers to protect us from coming too completely under the control of our mothers. . . . We want to be seen with Dad, hanging out with men and doing men things.
    Frank Pittman (20th century)