We Can Be Heroes: Finding The Australian of The Year

We Can Be Heroes: Finding The Australian of the Year (known mostly as The Nominees outside of Australia, but distributed with its original title in the iTunes UK store) is an Australian mockumentary TV series created, written and starring Chris Lilley and directed by Matthew Saville.

It follows the story of five unique Australians, who have each made a large achievement and been nominated by friends and family for the Australian of the Year award.

It premiered on 27 July 2005, and concluded on 31 August 2005. It was shown on the ABC on Wednesday nights at 9:00pm. There are six episodes, with each episode running for 30 minutes. The show is broadcast in the United Kingdom on FX and in the United States on the Sundance Channel. In Australia The Comedy Channel currently airs the series as part of their Aussie Gold block hosted by Frank Woodley. It currently airs on The Comedy Network in Canada. It currently is available to United States viewers on HBO On Demand and HBO Go until January 2, 2012.

The show won a Logie Award for most outstanding comedy and Chris Lilley won the Best New Talent Logie for his performance in the show.

Read more about We Can Be Heroes: Finding The Australian Of The YearEpisode List, Outside of The Show, DVD Release

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We Can Be Heroes: Finding The Australian Of The Year - DVD Release
... We Can Be Heroes Set details Special features 6 episodes 1 disc set 169 aspect ratio Subtitles yes English (2.0 stereo) Total running time 164 minutes 42 minutes of ...

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