Vulgate Cycle

Some articles on vulgate cycle, cycle, cycles, vulgate:

King Arthur - Medieval Literary Traditions - Romance Traditions
13th-century prose romances was the Vulgate Cycle (also known as the Lancelot-Grail Cycle), a series of five Middle French prose works written in the first half of ... the Estoire de Merlin, the Lancelot propre (or Prose Lancelot, which made up half the entire Vulgate Cycle on its own), the Queste del Saint Graal and the Mort Artu ... The cycle continued the trend towards reducing the role played by Arthur in his own legend, partly through the introduction of the character of Galahad and ...
Sangraal - Beginnings in Literature - Other Early Literature
... The Lancelot section of the vast Vulgate Cycle, which introduces the new Grail hero, Galahad ... The Queste del Saint Graal, another part of the Vulgate Cycle, concerning the adventures of Galahad and his achievement of the Grail ... de Boron’s Joseph d’Arimathie, The Estoire del Saint Graal, the first part of the Vulgate Cycle (but written after Lancelot and the Queste), based on Robert’s tale but ...
Lancelot-Grail
... The Lancelot–Grail, also known as the Prose Lancelot, the Vulgate Cycle, or the Pseudo-Map Cycle, is a major source of Arthurian legend written in French ... This cycle of works was one of the most important sources of Thomas Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur ... The Vulgate Cycle adds an intriguing dimension to the King Arthur tradition, perpetuating Christian themes by expanding on tales of the Holy Grail and recounting the quests of the Grail knights ...
Post-Vulgate Cycle
... The Post-Vulgate Cycle is one of the major Old French prose cycles of Arthurian literature ... It is essentially a rehandling of the earlier Vulgate Cycle (also known as the Lancelot-Grail Cycle), with much left out and much added, including characters and scenes from the Prose Tristan ... The Post-Vulgate, written probably between 1230 and 1240, is an attempt to create greater unity in the material, and to de-emphasise the secular love affair between Lancelot ...

Famous quotes containing the words cycle and/or vulgate:

    Oh, life is a glorious cycle of song,
    A medley of extemporanea;
    And love is a thing that can never go wrong;
    And I am Marie of Roumania.
    Dorothy Parker (1893–1967)

    The poem goes from the poet’s gibberish to
    The gibberish of the vulgate and back again.
    Does it move to and fro or is it of both
    At once? Is it a luminous flittering
    Or the concentration of a cloudy day?
    Wallace Stevens (1879–1955)