Verse

Verse may refer to:

Read more about Verse:  Poetry, Religion, Music

Other articles related to "verse":

ODD (Text Encoding Initiative) - The TEI Guidelines - Examples - Verse
... TEI has tags for marking up verse, this example (taken from the French translation of the TEI Guidelines) shows a sonnet Les amoureux fervents et les savants ...
Pothana - God's Writing
... This is a verse which describes the palace of Lord Vishnu in his divine abode (VAIKUNTHA), at the time the elephant king prayed for the Lord's kindness to deliver him out of the ... The story goes that Pothana wrote the first line of the verse, but could not continue (because he did not know how vaikuntha looks!) ... When he came back in the evening, he saw the verse completed ...
Manusmṛti - Structure
... The book is written in simple verse as opposed to the metrical verse of the preceding dharmasutras ... Manu also introduced a unique "transitional verse" which segued the end of one subject and the beginning of the next ...
Verse - Music - Other Uses
... Verse protocol, a networking protocol allowing real-time communication between computer graphics software Verse, a river of North Rhine-Westphalia, Germany ...
Into White
... The first verse has an organically built house - the body ... The second verse is a celebration of all that is outside - the sky, and beautiful and peaceful flora and fauna ... The third verse is of conflict and impending violence drawn against the innocent ...

Famous quotes containing the word verse:

    Wandering stars, to whom is reserved the blackness of darkness for ever.
    Bible: New Testament Jude, verse 13.

    Recalling the Book of Enoch, in which fallen angels were condemned to be stars.

    Time doth transfix the flourish set on youth
    And delves the parallels in beauty’s brow,
    Feeds on the rarities of nature’s truth,
    And nothing stands but for his scythe to mow:
    And yet to times in hope my verse shall stand,
    Praising thy worth, despite his cruel hand.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    Some poems are for holidays only. They are polished and sweet, but it is the sweetness of sugar, and not such as toil gives to sour bread. The breath with which the poet utters his verse must be that by which he lives.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)