Urban Planning in Communist Countries

Urban Planning In Communist Countries

Urban planning in communist countries was subject to the ideological constraints of the system. Except for the Soviet Union where the communist regime started in 1917, in Eastern Europe communist governments took power after World War II.

The ideological guidelines generated in Moscow and even if, in fields like urban planning, they were not imposed by force by the Soviet Union, the various communist regimes followed a generally similar approach, even if there are differences in the specific of urban planning in different communist countries.

Read more about Urban Planning In Communist Countries:  Beginnings of Urban Planning in Communist Countries, First Attempts of Socialist City Planning in Eastern Europe, Urban Development in The 1960s and 1970s, Planning of Rural Localities, North Korea

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Urban Planning In Communist Countries - North Korea
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