University of Washington College of Arts and Sciences

The University of Washington College of Arts and Sciences (CAS) is the liberal arts and sciences unit of the University of Washington. The CAS has 27,500 students and offers 5,600 different classes.

Famous quotes containing the words arts and sciences, university of, sciences, arts, university, washington and/or college:

    But here comes Generosity; giving—not to a decayed artist—but to the arts and sciences themselves.—See,—he builds ... whole schools and colleges for those who come after. Lord! how they will magnify his name!
    —One honest tear shed in private over the unfortunate, is worth them all.
    Laurence Sterne (1713–1768)

    It is in the nature of allegory, as opposed to symbolism, to beg the question of absolute reality. The allegorist avails himself of a formal correspondence between “ideas” and “things,” both of which he assumes as given; he need not inquire whether either sphere is “real” or whether, in the final analysis, reality consists in their interaction.
    Charles, Jr. Feidelson, U.S. educator, critic. Symbolism and American Literature, ch. 1, University of Chicago Press (1953)

    Letting a hundred flowers blossom and a hundred schools of thought contend is the policy for promoting the progress of the arts and the sciences and a flourishing culture in our land.
    Mao Zedong (1893–1976)

    Insurrection is an art, and like all arts has its own laws.
    Leon Trotsky (1879–1940)

    Fowls in the frith,
    Fishes in the flood,
    And I must wax wod:
    Much sorrow I walk with
    For best of bone and blood.
    —Unknown. Fowls in the Frith. . .

    Oxford Book of Short Poems, The. P. J. Kavanagh and James Michie, eds. Oxford University Press.

    When you wish upon a star your dreams come true.
    —Ned Washington (190l–1976)

    ... when you make it a moral necessity for the young to dabble in all the subjects that the books on the top shelf are written about, you kill two very large birds with one stone: you satisfy precious curiosities, and you make them believe that they know as much about life as people who really know something. If college boys are solemnly advised to listen to lectures on prostitution, they will listen; and who is to blame if some time, in a less moral moment, they profit by their information?
    Katharine Fullerton Gerould (1879–1944)