University of Utah Press

University Of Utah Press

The University of Utah Press is the independent publishing branch of the University of Utah and is a division of the J. Willard Marriott Library. Founded in 1949 by A. Ray Olpin, it is also the oldest university press in Utah. The mission of the Press is to “publish and disseminate scholarly books in selected fields, as well as other printed and recorded materials of significance to Utah, the region, the country, and the world."

The University of Utah Press publishes in the following general subject areas: anthropology, archaeology, Mesoamerican studies, American Indian studies, natural history, nature writing, Utah and Western history, Mormon studies, Utah and regional guidebooks, and regional titles. The Press employs seven people full-time and publishes from 25 to 35 titles per year. The Press has over 450 books currently in print.

The Press has partnerships with other organizations for whom it distributes books or DVDs. These include BYU Studies, Canyonlands Natural History Association, KUED Productions, and Western Epics Publications.

University of Utah Press
Founded 1949
Country of origin United States
Headquarters location Salt Lake City, Utah
Official website www.uofupress.com/portal/site/uofupress/



Read more about University Of Utah Press:  Selected Titles, Prizes, Series

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