University of Reading

The University of Reading is a university in the English town of Reading, Berkshire. The University was established in 1892 as University College, Reading and received its Royal Charter in 1926. It is based on several campuses in, and around, the town of Reading.

The University has a long tradition of research, education and training at a local, national and international level. It offers traditional degrees and also less usual and other vocationally relevant ones. It was awarded the Queen's Anniversary Prize for Higher and Further Education in 1998, 2005, 2009 and again in 2011. It is one of the ten most research intensive universities in the UK and it is ranked 164th in the top 200 THE rankings.

Read more about University Of Reading:  History, Campuses, Research, Community, University Halls and Accommodation, Museums, Libraries and Botanical Gardens, Working With Business, Notable Academics, Notable Alumni

Other articles related to "university of reading, university, university of":

University Of Reading - Notable Alumni
... See also CategoryAlumni of the University of Reading Academics Ash Amin – Professor of Geography, Durham University L.J.F ... Professor of Physics at Imperial College London, Vice-chancellor of Loughborough University Stephen E ... Calvert – Emeritus Professor of Geology, University of British Columbia Michael Cox – Professor of International Relations, London School of Economics Sir Peter Crane ...

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