University of Pikeville

The University of Pikeville (nicknamed UPike and formerly known as Pikeville College) is a private, liberal arts university affiliated with the Presbyterian Church, located in Pikeville, Kentucky, United States. The university is located on a 25-acre (10 ha) campus on a hillside overlooking downtown Pikeville. The university was founded in 1889 by the Presbyterian Church. The university is part of a growing movement and state-supported study, known as Bill 270, to make the university part of Kentucky's state university system. Its current president is former Kentucky Governor Paul E. Patton.

The university is home to the Kentucky College of Osteopathic Medicine, one of three medical schools in the state of Kentucky. The university confers associate, bachelor's, master's and doctorate degrees through its six academic divisions and one medical college; and has a current enrollment over 1,800 students. The university has a vibrant campus life, with over 30 student organizations, spiritual life groups, and intramural sports. Its intercollegiate athletic teams, called the Bears, are members of the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics at the NAIA Division I level and participate in the Mid-South Conference.

Read more about University Of Pikeville:  History, Campus, Athletics, Notable Alumni

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University Of Pikeville - Notable Alumni
... Attended in 1953–54 and 1954–55 went to the University of South Carolina afterward to play basketball and was named a consensus Second Team All-American and led ... in 1988 former assistant and head basketball coach at Marshall University (1990–1996 2007–2010, respectively) and assistant basketball coach at the University of Florida (1996–20 ... He is currently the head basketball coach at the University of Central Florida ...

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